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Author Topic: Hoovering about?  (Read 3019 times)

Offline Geezer

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Hoovering about?
« on: 14/10/2011 00:44:51 »
If a hoover is a hoover, why is a sewing machine not a singer?


 

Offline RD

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #1 on: 14/10/2011 03:15:52 »
Perhaps because cleaning by sucking was a novel concept: no existing name for the process.

Whereas the concept of (hand) sewing preexisted the sewing machine, so no need for neologism.

 



 

Offline Geezer

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #2 on: 14/10/2011 20:32:54 »
That's a good explantion RD. I wonder if the Swedes "electrolux" their carpets, or maybe the verb is "ahuufer"?  ;)
 

Offline RD

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #3 on: 15/10/2011 07:12:14 »
The Germans have an amusing Denglisch name for the mobile / cell phone ...
« Last Edit: 15/10/2011 07:22:23 by RD »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #4 on: 15/10/2011 09:36:43 »
I think it depends on marketing and market penetration.

As the sewing machines were being distributed, there were several different brands to choose from, and there were many people who were late to incorporate them.

I presume the Xerox machine had nearly 100% market penetration early on.

Polaroid did have 100% market penetration for the consumer grade instant photos.

Crescent would have patented their novel type of adjustable end wrench with an angled head.  Still, a monkey wrench is a good substitute with more adjustment than the typical Crescent.  In fact, "Crescent" would have been more specific than saying "adjustable end wrench" which would have included both the Crescents and the Monkey Wrenches.

I presume that patents actually protect the early innovators.  So, if the brand can get high market penetration early on, then the names might be considered synonymous. 

The other thing, a lot of work often goes into naming products with catchy names.
 

Offline Geezer

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #5 on: 15/10/2011 15:52:09 »
Crescent would have patented their novel type of adjustable end wrench with an angled head. 

It took me a while to figure that one out (Oh! You mean a shifting spanner!) and even then, I thought it was descriptive rather than a company name for some time.

BTW, if you happen to find a little one that says Jaguar on it, it could be worth a few quid. I recently sold one that I picked up in a garage sale for $160
« Last Edit: 15/10/2011 20:46:24 by Geezer »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #6 on: 15/10/2011 20:54:46 »
A lot of this may be somewhat local.

I just think of a Vacuum Cleaner, and wouldn't consider a "Hoover" as being synonymous with a vacuum.  Actually, I'd be more likely to associate hydro-electric energy with Hoover, although I don't believe that a Hoover Dam would fit into my living room!!!

One of the tricks in business is to invent something.  Patent it.  Name it.  Then trademark the name.  And, of course, put the name very prominently on the device.

For example Skilsaw or Sawzall.  Noting, of course, that I would choose any brand other than Skil for a handheld circular saw!!!

 

Offline Geezer

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #7 on: 15/10/2011 22:59:40 »
I just think of a Vacuum Cleaner, and wouldn't consider a "Hoover" as being synonymous with a vacuum. 

You're right. In the UK, hoover is not only a noun, but it's also a verb. You might hear people say things like, "Did you buy an Electrolux hoover", and "I didn't hear the phone because I was hoovering the carpet."
 

Offline Airthumbs

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #8 on: 16/10/2011 10:11:12 »
We always called a hoover the vacuum cleaner, I suppose that means the marketing failed on our family  ;D
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #9 on: 16/10/2011 16:46:49 »
Did anyone Google the answer?
 

Offline Geezer

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #10 on: 16/10/2011 21:09:03 »
Did anyone Google the answer?

I did, but I couldn't find my biro to write it down.
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #11 on: 16/10/2011 21:12:47 »
It gets even worse.

"What kind of washing machine did you get?"

"A Hoover."

"You mean you bought a vacuum cleaner instead?"

« Last Edit: 16/10/2011 21:23:39 by Geezer »
 

Offline RD

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #12 on: 16/10/2011 22:43:30 »
We always called a hoover the vacuum cleaner

Not even "Henry" ? ...
« Last Edit: 16/10/2011 22:49:24 by RD »
 

Offline Don_1

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #13 on: 20/10/2011 10:40:56 »
If a hoover is a hoover, why is a sewing machine not a singer?

Because its got a rotten voice and never gets the lyrics right.
 

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Hoovering about?
« Reply #13 on: 20/10/2011 10:40:56 »

 

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