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Author Topic: Is the centre of a black hole a Bose Einstein Condensate?  (Read 2123 times)

Matt Cooper

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Matt Cooper  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi,

Really enjoy the show.

I have two questions which I'd love an answer to and which hopefully might intrigue yourselves.

1) What is the difference between a Bose-Einstein condensate and the
core of a black hole. I kind of understand they are both a breakdown
of particles into a single quantum thing but beyond that I have no
idea. Are they the same, similar, totally unrelated?

2) Why are entangled photons not evidence of extra dimensions. The
science community seems keen to suggest faster than light neutrinos
may be evidence of extra dimensions but I don't recall it being
mentioned with regard to entangled photons, but in my mind how else do you explain them?

thanks
Matt Cooper
Plymouth

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 15/10/2011 20:30:02 by _system »


 

Offline yor_on

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Is the centre of a black hole a Bose Einstein Condensate?
« Reply #1 on: 16/10/2011 00:04:46 »
1. Nah, don't think so. Related maybe, if we assume that there are some physics defining it all, but the center of a Black Hole is not known, a 'condensate' we can make.

2. You mean like there should be some inter dimensional 'shortcut' keeping count of the entanglement?

First you have to explain why a 'distance' is frame dependent. Because if it really is, then we don't need any 'extra dimensions' to define it, even though we might not have the way to describe it properly yet. As a guess.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Is the centre of a black hole a Bose Einstein Condensate?
« Reply #2 on: 16/10/2011 00:15:07 »
it is unlikely but not totally impossible.  A Bose Einstein condensate is when a group of atoms that are bosons that is atoms that do not have any residual unbalanced spins are cooled down so much that the all coalesce onto the same quantum state and become totally indistinguishable from each other and behave like a single quantum particle.  This does not happen with particles that have a residual spin which are fermions and cannot exist in the same quantum state and so must all have slightly different energy levels.

the centre of a black hole is higlhy likely to have a high energy unless something unusual happens on the way.
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Is the centre of a black hole a Bose Einstein Condensate?
« Reply #3 on: 16/10/2011 00:59:48 »
In the first period of expansion after the bigbang, the energy was probably a hot version of Bose Einstein condensate.
 

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Is the centre of a black hole a Bose Einstein Condensate?
« Reply #4 on: 16/10/2011 09:58:02 »
Agreed, that is a possible scenario

Look at this week's New Scientist there is growing evidence from several sources that the universe as a whole has a residual spin axis and this may be essential to ensure that there is an imbalance between matter and antimatter. so there will always be an excess of fermions  (particles with spin angular momentum built into them)

Bose Einstein condensations tend to hang together. My guess is that the expansion driver for the universe is fermionic in nature because it is the fermions that require and could in fact create space.
 

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Is the centre of a black hole a Bose Einstein Condensate?
« Reply #4 on: 16/10/2011 09:58:02 »

 

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