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Author Topic: Imidacloprid poses serious risk to bees  (Read 2076 times)

Philipps Charles

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Imidacloprid poses serious risk to bees
« on: 03/11/2011 03:01:03 »
Philipps Charles  asked the Naked Scientists:
   Hello Dr Chris Smith,

Usually i enjoy listening to your podcast.á I was listening to the podcast "plant pests and plant pathology" and one of the talkers suggested about the leaf miner to use "imidacloprid". This is a very dangerous chemical that kills bees.

How do i know ? By personnal practical experiment, by the way i'm now professional bee-keeper but previously researcher in chemistry, Liverpool university.

Please do not let just people say things without knowing all the facts. Imidacloprid is really not so inoffensive and by all mean do not promote imidacloprid use by the public !

This chemical and their family "neonicotino´ds" is toxic for human and
 for bees.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imidacloprid

so please bear this in mind.

thanks you for reading this email

best regards,

Dr Charles Philipps.

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 03/11/2011 03:01:03 by _system »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Imidacloprid poses serious risk to bees
« Reply #1 on: 03/11/2011 08:05:23 »
There are a number of pesticides that are dangerous for bees. 

If farmers want bees to pollinate their crops, they should take into account the effects of pesticides on their little friends. 

If one is spraying an orchard, then it should not be sprayed while there are flowers on the trees.  If one waits until after the flowers are gone, then there will be little effect on the bees.  Perhaps there is also a point where some pesticides can be safely applied before the flowers too.
 

Offline Don_1

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Imidacloprid poses serious risk to bees
« Reply #2 on: 03/11/2011 11:04:45 »
Unfortunately, Clifford, imidacloprid is a systemic insecticide. Bee keepers in France noticed losses where these nicotine based insecticides were in use.

Following a government study, the use of imidacloprid pesticides was banned in France. Germany and Italy followed suit.

Look here.

Considering the concern of honey bee problems already existant, I agree that it is wrong to use pesticides which may be another threat to these most important creatures.

The use of contact insecticides (when the bees are not active) is far better than one which, as this one does, enters the plant through the root effecting the leaves and pollen. Obviously, it will be argued that systemic insecticides are cheaper and more effective than contact insecticides. But if we are to protect our most important pollinator, then any price is affordable.

Personally, I think Dr Philipps should be commended for bringing this to our attention.

Colony Collapse Disorder poses a very real and very serious threat to honey bees. Insecticides have already been linked to CCD and Imidacloprid has been singled out as one the main culprits. Here's a little more reading on the subject.
We really should be looking to ban these insecticides, if not for the sake of the bees, for our own sake.
« Last Edit: 03/11/2011 11:51:40 by Don_1 »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Imidacloprid poses serious risk to bees
« Reply #3 on: 04/11/2011 04:42:37 »
Thanks,

I didn't realize that someone came up with the idea of applying insecticide like fertilizer, which means that there is no way to wash it off either.

Actually, I've been surprised at how few worms I get in my apples.  I think it may be due to the deer helping me keep the windfalls cleaned up.

 

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Imidacloprid poses serious risk to bees
« Reply #3 on: 04/11/2011 04:42:37 »

 

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