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Author Topic: faster than light neutrinos, a second experiment apparently confirms it?  (Read 7452 times)

Offline JP

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Fair enough.  It would be interesting if it were a new kind of interaction, but they'd have to design an independent experiment to look for this interaction. 
 

Offline flr

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Offline imatfaal

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A recent rebuttal of FTL neutrinos by an experimental group:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/site/newspaper/news/sc-nw-1122-speed-of-light-20111122,0,6218959.story

Unfo we live in a empirical world in which experiment trumps theory.  The ICARUS team, like Glashow/Coleman, have privileged Einstein's theories over experiment.  You cannot rebut experimental proof with theoretical thought - no matter how good, nor how many Nobel prizes (h/t Prof Glashow) you have, experimental evidence trumps all.  The fact that our current theories do not allow superluminal velocity of any particle means that we are very cautious about accepting any experimental result which show FTL - but if a documented and repeatable experiment shows FTL then the theories can be ripped up - because in the scientific method empirical results are king. 

Rebuttal is just the wrong word
 

Offline simplified

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A recent rebuttal of FTL neutrinos by an experimental group:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/site/newspaper/news/sc-nw-1122-speed-of-light-20111122,0,6218959.story
Calculations of relativity disprove result of experiment disproving relativity.It is usual disproving of theory by measurings of experiment. :D
 

Offline JP

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In the article, they say that FTL neutrinos would radiate away energy too quickly.  I'm curious how they came up with this if FTL neutrinos are currently not allowed by theory.
 

Offline simplified

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In the article, they say that FTL neutrinos would radiate away energy too quickly.  I'm curious how they came up with this if FTL neutrinos are currently not allowed by theory.
You are righter.They assumed like me.
 

Offline syhprum

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The only way could imagine this question being settled is if both photons and Neutrinos could be generated simultaneously and passed through the same vacuum pipe to the detectors.
I cannot imagine a 730Km line being constructed but maybe 20Km or so might do the job if the pulse could be made short enough.
 

Offline simplified

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The only way could imagine this question being settled is if both photons and Neutrinos could be generated simultaneously and passed through the same vacuum pipe to the detectors.
I cannot imagine a 730Km line being constructed but maybe 20Km or so might do the job if the pulse could be made short enough.
I welcome any such experiments.I think they can dispatch relativity in other section. ;D
 

Offline Geezer

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The only way could imagine this question being settled is if both photons and Neutrinos could be generated simultaneously and passed through the same vacuum pipe to the detectors.
I cannot imagine a 730Km line being constructed but maybe 20Km or so might do the job if the pulse could be made short enough.

Perhaps c is slightly greater in close proximity to a large mass of fairly dense material too. After all, we do know light is affected by mass.

It might not be too difficult to find out. A distance of a few meters might be sufficient to detect a difference.

Presumably someone has done an experiment along these lines in the past?   
 

Offline JP

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The only way could imagine this question being settled is if both photons and Neutrinos could be generated simultaneously and passed through the same vacuum pipe to the detectors.
I cannot imagine a 730Km line being constructed but maybe 20Km or so might do the job if the pulse could be made short enough.

Perhaps c is slightly greater in close proximity to a large mass of fairly dense material too. After all, we do know light is affected by mass.

It might not be too difficult to find out. A distance of a few meters might be sufficient to detect a difference.

Presumably someone has done an experiment along these lines in the past?  

One of the assumptions of general relativity is that the speed of light is constant everywhere in a gravitational field.  If this weren't the case, some problems should have been found when trying to test GR. 
 

Offline Geezer

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The only way could imagine this question being settled is if both photons and Neutrinos could be generated simultaneously and passed through the same vacuum pipe to the detectors.
I cannot imagine a 730Km line being constructed but maybe 20Km or so might do the job if the pulse could be made short enough.

Perhaps c is slightly greater in close proximity to a large mass of fairly dense material too. After all, we do know light is affected by mass.

It might not be too difficult to find out. A distance of a few meters might be sufficient to detect a difference.

Presumably someone has done an experiment along these lines in the past?  

One of the assumptions of general relativity is that the speed of light is constant everywhere in a gravitational field.  If this weren't the case, some problems should have been found when trying to test GR. 

Yes, but did anyone ever actually try drilling a small hole through a large rock and timing light transit time? I imagine most of our observations with light and gravity are on more of a cosmic scale.

I'd be very surprised if the result came out at anything other than c myself, but if it's not too difficult to run the experiment, why not run it and find out?
 

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