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Author Topic: What causes seizures?  (Read 2484 times)

Offline DAVID WOOD

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What causes seizures?
« on: 18/11/2011 09:26:12 »
what causes seizures?
« Last Edit: 19/11/2011 10:26:40 by chris »


 

Offline CZARCAR

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Re: What causes seizures?
« Reply #1 on: 18/11/2011 15:22:32 »
methinx ionization of air associated with thunderstorms may be a factor?
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: What causes seizures?
« Reply #2 on: 19/11/2011 06:51:41 »
Seizures are essentially abnormal brain activity...  Essentially electrical activity bouncing around the brain in abnormal patterns.

There are a number of different causes of seizures.

Febrile seizures occur occasionally, as a secondary result of an illness.  They often do not recur. 

Epilepsy might be caused by an abnormal focal point in the brain.
 

Offline DAVID WOOD

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Re: What causes seizures?
« Reply #3 on: 19/11/2011 08:19:22 »
i took a biology class in collage and i asked this question and my professor had a hard time explaining it to me but what she told me if i remember correctly is that the brain is electrically charged 1/2 is positive and the other 1/2 is negative and what happens is that when a seizure occurs the brain becomes 100% one or the other and its some sort of electric imbalance not sure if that is right it has been awhile if anyone can confirm this or not please let me know
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: What causes seizures?
« Reply #4 on: 19/11/2011 08:47:06 »
That doesn't sound quite right.

Essentially in nature, every positive charge has to have a negative charge...  nearby, although there can be a slight separation between the two.

Neurons at rest have a slight negative charge inside, and positive charge outside.  When the neuron fires, it allows positive ions (Sodium (Na+)) to enter which propagates the action potential down the axon, and to other neurons, or to organs such as muscles.

During a seizure, large groups of neurons start firing in somewhat of a chaotic fashion, causing essentially an electrical spike to bounce around the brain.  Often the individual has no recollection of the actual event, although they may remember an aura that occurs just before the seizure (which may help them recognize when a seizure is imminent).. 

So, I suppose in a sense, large groups of neurons get simultaneously depolarized and depolarized as the neurons abnormally fire, then recover, perhaps to be depolarized again.
 

Offline DAVID WOOD

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What causes seizures?
« Reply #5 on: 21/11/2011 07:32:08 »
well the reason for the question is that i have what they call Non-Epileptic seizures i had a couple head injuries when i was younger i dated a girl with complex partial Epilepsy she got that from a bad shot as a baby and my current girlfriend has them do to a brain tumor but with the meds they are ok
 

Offline CZARCAR

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What causes seizures?
« Reply #6 on: 21/11/2011 17:14:06 »
methinx ionization of air associated with thunderstorms may be a factor?
ionized air enhances electrical conductivity?
 

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What causes seizures?
« Reply #6 on: 21/11/2011 17:14:06 »

 

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