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Author Topic: Why are "gourmet" foods kind of gross?  (Read 3018 times)

Offline cheryl j

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Why are "gourmet" foods kind of gross?
« on: 25/11/2011 06:21:38 »
Why are certain foods that are considered classy or an aquired taste almost but not quite disgusting or rotten tasting? A lot them are in fact fermented. For example Blue Cheese or Brie, wine, Fois gras, oysters, snails,lobster tamelly, various mushrooms, caviar, creme de fraiche. You can probably think of others. Is it psychological? Do we like to flirt with disaster, or are almost rotten foods, like over ripe fruit, more tastey for biochemical reasons?


 

Offline CliffordK

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Why are "gourmet" foods kind of gross?
« Reply #1 on: 25/11/2011 08:41:12 »
All cheeses are fermented or aged, with bacteria or yeasts being part of the processing. changing forms of food to another, more desirable form.

Wine, and beer, of course are fermented, using yeasts to replace sugars with alcohol.

Some of the foods on your list can be "fresh".

With oysters, you can have them fresh.

Pop them open with a knife.  Poke them with a fork.  If they move, they're fresh and can be eaten.  If they don't move, they aren't fresh...  and you shouldn't eat them.  Can't get much more fresh that that!
 

Offline Don_1

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Why are "gourmet" foods kind of gross?
« Reply #2 on: 25/11/2011 10:32:39 »
Cheryl, oh Cheryl!

How can you not like a good Camembert? It is the epitome of great cheese and, incidentally, should not be more than 30 days old when consumed. As for blue cheeses, a fine aged Stilton or a nice fresh Roquefort is sheer bliss.

I pity those poor Americans who may never know the creamy wonderful taste of Camembert and Brie. I don't know what their pasteurised substitute tastes like, and I don't think I want to.

Pate de Fois Gras, what a stunningly fine taste and texture.

Snails? OK, but for the herb and garlick butter, they aren't so appealing. Try the same herb & garlick butter on some nice fresh Mussels! Beautiful!

Caviar. Well I have never had the real McCoy, the Beluga. At around 200 for 50gm, its really not the sort of thing I can afford, but having had its poor relatives (a farmed Sevruga and Lumpfish), I don't really know what all the fuss is about. Even Lumpfish Caviar is around 15 for 100gm. Too salty for my liking.

Truffle, well yes, I think that's one greatly over-hyped fungi, but not rotten or risky.

Lobster, crab, mussels, squid and just about any such 'fruits de mer' (pardon my French) I just adore. As a child I remember the seafood man coming round the streets on a Sunday afternoon. A pint of winkles made a cheap Sunday teatime meal. Winkle sandwich!!! On a nostalgia trip, I had some a while ago. Eeee by gum, I had forgoten how good they taste.

But I must admit, there are some of these 'acquired taste' foods which do put me right off. I wouldn't even try them given the opportunity. Sheep's eyeballs.... YUK. Brains (which I did try) bloody awful in texture and not something I was keen to swallow.

But think about it, dog, horse, locust, ants, grubs of this sort and that and (much to my absolute disgust and utter objection) Turtle. Aren't these as repulsive and objectionable to us as pig and cow are to others?

What about those strange Chinese delicacies, birds nest soup and 1000yr old eggs! Birds nest soup I find objectionable as much for the disruption it causes to the poor Swifts which went to so much trouble to build them as to the fact that you might as well just boil up any old spit, add a soupcon of guano and serve it up. And those 1000yr old eggs are, in actual fact, usually no more than 100 days old. But I still don't fancy that idea.

I do think it is a psychological thing in some ways and perhaps even a class thing, but I just can't agree with you on those cheeses, pate and seafood.
 

Offline SeanB

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Why are "gourmet" foods kind of gross?
« Reply #3 on: 25/11/2011 19:28:17 »
One man's gourmet food is another's daily fare. Tastes in various regions vary, as do the dishes.
 

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Why are "gourmet" foods kind of gross?
« Reply #3 on: 25/11/2011 19:28:17 »

 

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