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Author Topic: Fluffy yet not insulating?  (Read 1941 times)

Offline Karsten

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Fluffy yet not insulating?
« on: 28/12/2011 18:19:04 »
Hello All:

I am looking for a material that is fluffy yet does not insulate against heat loss as much as most other fluffy materials. Well, it should at insulate maybe like cotton. And, no, I don't want it to be wet or something. Basically, I am trying to make a fluffy and comfortable, yet not very warm blanket. Any ideas?


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #1 on: 29/12/2011 04:01:45 »
Air is a reasonably good insulator if it can be blocked from moving.  And, thus, fluffy insulation blocks air movement, and uses it to insulate.  A good "wind breaker" is also surprisingly insulating due to blocking the wind.

To get fluffyness without insulation, you will have to figure out how to maximize the air flow, while maintaining the fluffyness.  For example, a tangle of fishing line might be fluffy, but wouldn't block the wind, and thus wouldn't be insulating.

You could also look for materials that have very high heat conduction.  For example, copper wool would likely feel cool to the touch as long as the ambient temperature is not too high.
 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #2 on: 29/12/2011 05:40:58 »
How about titanium chainmail, or, you could go with woven asbestos, although that might not be too popular.
 
(This is really a question for Sheepy.)
 

Offline RD

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #3 on: 29/12/2011 07:04:45 »
How about titanium chainmail

Wire wool would be cheaper. :) but scratchy.

I did hear a story about prisoners having to make prison-officers uniforms and would sew a few strands of wire-wool into the seams of the trousers.  [:0] 

Q. Does electrically conductive foam also conduct heat ?

Update:
A. no, it's about the same as regular insulating material ...

Quote
Thermal conductivity of electrically conductive foam 0.039  [W/(mˇK)]
http://www.qualityfoam.com/docs/156_LD30SD.pdf

Quote
Hollow Fill Fibre Insulation ... 0.042
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_conductivity#Experimental_values
« Last Edit: 29/12/2011 07:37:55 by RD »
 

Offline Karsten

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #4 on: 30/12/2011 02:34:14 »
Air is a reasonably good insulator if it can be blocked from moving.  And, thus, fluffy insulation blocks air movement, and uses it to insulate.  A good "wind breaker" is also surprisingly insulating due to blocking the wind.

To get fluffyness without insulation, you will have to figure out how to maximize the air flow, while maintaining the fluffyness.  For example, a tangle of fishing line might be fluffy, but wouldn't block the wind, and thus wouldn't be insulating.

You could also look for materials that have very high heat conduction.  For example, copper wool would likely feel cool to the touch as long as the ambient temperature is not too high.

Yeah, I was worried that that would be the limiting factor. I have to get the air to move around. I like the tangle of fishing line concept.
 

Offline lightspeed301

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #5 on: 04/01/2012 02:34:34 »
I believe the issue is not so much with the material as it is with the weave.  Years ago a lady friend of mine knitted a small comforter with a relatively coarse weave. I can easily work my index finger through the weave with a little twisting. But it sort of looks to be solid fabric from a distance.

Think of a thick knitted sweater, for instance. Cozy, not hot, and not humid.

 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #6 on: 04/01/2012 05:41:01 »
I've been trying to think of what I've seen a fairly course, not-so-insulating weave in.

The pad for a floor sander is about 1" thick, but quite a loose weave.  Not quite soft though.
 

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Re: Fluffy yet not insulating?
« Reply #6 on: 04/01/2012 05:41:01 »

 

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