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Author Topic: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?  (Read 3299 times)

Offline Geezer

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Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« on: 03/01/2012 00:20:04 »
It's possible that Amazon will make its Silk browser available for PCs. The general idea is to shift a lot of processing load from the end point to cloud servers. Performance results on tablets seem to be a bit mixed so far, so it may not take off.

Still, it's an interesting idea. What do you think?



 

Offline RD

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #1 on: 03/01/2012 00:54:13 »
Cloud computing is certainly a way of keeping control over software: the program is not on the users computer for them to copy and pirate, (or reverse engineer).

It will be a big load on the internet, every keystroke and joystick twitch having to be transmitted across cyberspace in real time.

Privacy nightmare too: all your info is on someone else’s computer, who has access to it ?
« Last Edit: 03/01/2012 01:01:42 by RD »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #2 on: 03/01/2012 01:21:17 »
In theory, doing remote processing would be a tremendous savings.

Think of my old Apple computer running with a 300 baud modem.
About the speed of an old dot matrix printer.

Anyway, it wasn't bad, you can only type so fast afterall.

The problem comes with graphics, but even a program like pcAnywhere, or various remote desktop clients can perform reasonably well at down to 9600 baud or so.

I groan whenever I see Firefox gobbling up over 1 GB of memory.  Some kind of remote computing would likely use much less power at the client.  "Thin Clients". 

However, the server capacity required might be pretty extraordinary.  Or...  perhaps software developers would have to be more efficient.

And, likely it wouldn't be quite a smooth with popups and etc.  A one-second network hiccup would be quite bothersome. 

Anyway, this will all depend on who is paying for what.  If it requires server-farms with 1000x the capacity of current servers, I doubt it will be popular with the businesses who seem to offload a lot of the processing to the local client PC's.  However, one might have some benefit of optimizing network traffic, so there could be a trade-off.

It might help with the control of network viruses, or at least shift them from the client side to the server side which is good for the clients, but bad for the businesses.
 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #3 on: 03/01/2012 06:24:56 »
I think it will be interesting to see where this goes. In some respects it's almost full circle to the original model with a CPU and a bunch of dumb(ish) terminals.

Personally, I think it has great potential to simplify things and dramatically improve security. If may have been "cool" to own a computer once upon a time, but now it's just a pain in the neck!

It has the potential to properly segregate communication (webby type stuff) from computing (actually using your computer to, as it were, compute, and store data.)

The webby type stuff is virtually all about sending pictures to a display. All that takes is a decent amount of bandwidth. When we are doing webby stuff, the processor in a PC is doing, on average, virtually nothing, although it is a pretty good space heater. It would be interesting to compare the useful processor cycles actually used in, say, the US with the wasted processor cycles. I'll bet the result is a very, very small number.

What's even better about this model is that the virus problem is completely offloaded from my computer. When I'm on the web, all I'm seeing are images presented from some computer in the cloud. Because there is no web browser on my computer, there is no reason why any website should be allowed to run any sort of program on my computer without my explicit permission.

The problem with the current model is that the browser functions rely on, and are all mixed up with, the local computing functions on a PC. That may have been understandable when hardware was very expensive, but it makes no sense now. Of course, the big software companies have no interest in changing the model, but somebody will, if it makes sense.

(OK - so it was a loaded question!)
 
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #4 on: 03/01/2012 12:30:26 »
I like clouds !

There's a laptop/notebook the market here in the UK (also in US too) (Chromebook)  that is specifically just for use in the cloud !..It comes with a no frills operating system (boots in seconds)






« Last Edit: 03/01/2012 12:32:43 by neilep »
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #5 on: 03/01/2012 17:39:41 »
Nice having a cloud to do the heavy work, but it is depending on a data link. Not going to work if the link is down, and here data is both expensive, and not reliable. Mobile data much more so, and coverage is spotty for anything other than EDGE, even in major centres. WiFi, 4 local signals all with WPA2 on ( no free wifi with the data costs) and the uncapped plans are both expensive, throttled and contended.

Low cost tablets are going to be popular, as well as smartphones that are cheap and easy to use. Not many apps other than a browser and a media player are needed, along with a FM radio ( often the only radio in the household).
 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #6 on: 03/01/2012 20:16:15 »
I like clouds !

There's a laptop/notebook the market here in the UK (also in US too) (Chromebook)  that is specifically just for use in the cloud !..It comes with a no frills operating system (boots in seconds)


Yup! I think PC sales are going to drop like a rock. (Judging from the prices, I think they are already.) I hope Microsoft and Intel have figured out what they are going to do for an encore.
 

Offline syhprum

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #7 on: 04/01/2012 01:48:28 »
I really do not like the idea it is putting the clock back 50 years years we have just got to the stage where we can have what would have been considered a super computer 20 years ago for a few hundred pounds and we are meant to throw it away and depend on communication links that we must pay to use.
Viruses are not such a big deal if you keep up with your software maintainence.
 

Offline Michalec

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #8 on: 13/02/2012 04:36:47 »
Personally, I would rather have a PC at my desk.  Don't get me wrong, I love the cloud for email and file sharing, etc.  But I control the power on my desktop.  If it is slower than I like I can upgrade it.  If I want more video power or memory I can add that.  Hard Drive Space isn't a problem either.  If I want to buy a new PC every 10 years or every 2 it is my decision.  I can even buy used.  I have control.  I have freedom.

If everything moves to the cloud then who has control?  If it is running slower than I like what do I do?  What is my ISP going to charge me for this?  Right now they get quite pissy if I download over 250GB in a month.  How much will I be downloading if everything I do is online?  What do I do if an application I am using locks up hard?  Will I have to call someone?  Will they answer the phone at 1:30AM on Sunday or will I have to leave a message.  Will there be prioritization?  Will my stuff get slowed down if someone more important needs to do something (NASA for instance?)  Also, what about hackers?  "Sorry Boss, we can't work today because a hacker group is doing a denial of service attack on our Cloud, guess we will try tomorrow."  Lastly, as has already been stated, there is privacy.  All the naked pictures of my dogs will stay safe on my PC behind my firewall where no one can get them and post them on Cheeseburger. 

I do not mind using my android phone or storing a few docs on Google and I love my hosted Exchange account, but I am in no hurry to have a dumb terminal set on my desk.  For me it is a matter of trust and convenience.  When I want my PC it is there.  If the internet is down it is still there.  If I want to play Skyrim, there it is.  As far as trust goes, who do you trust more than yourself?  AT&T? Comcast? Orange Business? Google? Your Government?  Maybe RIAA can run it? Oh how about the ATF? 
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #9 on: 13/02/2012 05:07:02 »
One thing about security in a business environment.
If all data access is being done in a client/server basis (windows terminal server).  Then, it is less likely that people will be tempted to download a copy of a database onto their PC.

It is not uncommon to hear of a laptop that is stolen containing critical data files.

With a terminal server environment, the data files reside on the server and the stolen laptop doesn't contain personal information.  Nor does it contain any unrecoverable data.

It is much easier to centrally back up data, rather than backing up data off of hundreds, or thousands of individual hard drives across a company.  In tech support, I dealt with dozens of crashed hard drives.  I'd do the best I could to recover the data, but sometimes that wasn't possible. 

And, of course, there is always the attempt to recover data from projects that former employees were working on, which means preserving the data.
 

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Re: Will there be a browser paradigm shift?
« Reply #9 on: 13/02/2012 05:07:02 »

 

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