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Author Topic: How do I calculate the concentration of a chemical solution?  (Read 1934 times)

Offline ---

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I want to convert 1 mg/L hydrogen peroxide+1 mg/L copper (I) to mol/L. Would the calculation be:
1/34.01 (molar mass of hydrogen peroxide) + 1/98.99 (molar mass of copper (I)).
=0.029/1000 = 0.000029mol/L + 0.010/1000 = 0.00001mol/L = 0.000039 mol/L hydrogen peroxide+copper (I)?
« Last Edit: 14/08/2012 09:37:22 by chris »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: concentration
« Reply #1 on: 16/01/2012 23:56:26 »
It depends on the solution.

If you have 1L of hydrogen peroxide.
Plus
1L of Copper.

Your total should yield 2 liters.

And, the final concentration would be essentially the average concentration of the two solutions you added (half of what you calculated).

If you are making a single combined solution, remember, one first adds the two solutes, then brings the solution up to precisely 1L.

If you are dealing with milligrams, then it is often easiest to report the answer in millimoles.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: concentration
« Reply #1 on: 16/01/2012 23:56:26 »

 

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