The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: mixing water activity  (Read 2206 times)

Offline bplaoxu

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
mixing water activity
« on: 20/01/2012 18:07:55 »
1)what do you think will happen if equal parts of 10 degree celsius and 60 degree celsius water were mixed?

2) What would make a pool containing 22 degree celsisu water feel cool on one day and warm on another?

3) What do you think causes your temperature to rise when you are sick?  Can you lower your temperature by having a cold drink? Why or why not?


 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8650
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #1 on: 20/01/2012 18:42:56 »
Looks like it might be  homework to me but if you promise that it isn't we might answer.
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #2 on: 20/01/2012 20:33:03 »
Looks like it might be  homework to me but if you promise that it isn't we might answer.
Then you might as well introduce the thermal expansion coefficient...  and confuse the whole answer!  :o

bplaoxu,
Why don't you add your own answers to the questions, and then we will comment on those answers.
« Last Edit: 20/01/2012 20:37:05 by CliffordK »
 

Offline Don_1

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6890
  • Thanked: 7 times
  • A stupid comment for every occasion.
    • View Profile
    • Knight Light Haulage
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #3 on: 24/01/2012 07:57:21 »
bplaoxu,
Why don't you add your own answers to the questions, and then we will comment on those answers.

Smart thinking!

10/10 and a gold star for your homework, Clifford. Go straight to the top of the class.
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #4 on: 24/01/2012 08:53:03 »
It looks like bplaoxu hasn't shown up for a few days...   :-\  BC must have scared him or her away.

If someone has made an effort, but is truly stuck, then I don't see a problem with helping them figure out what went wrong as long as it is not excessive. 

For example, someone was calculating molarity the other day, and forgot that when they mixed 2 liters of substances together, they ended up with 2 liters, rather than 1.  Anyway, sometimes a second set of eyes can be helpful.  Although, sometimes just formulating the question is enough to realize one's own error.

Of course, so much info is available on the net now..  that it doesn't take much to find many answers.
 

Offline bplaoxu

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #5 on: 24/01/2012 10:10:23 »
i knew the answer already, just wanna to test how efficient this forum is?
if bc dont want to answer questions, let it be!!!

 

Offline Nizzle

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 964
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Extropian by choice!
    • View Profile
    • Carnivorous Plants
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #6 on: 24/01/2012 10:42:07 »
i knew the answer already, just wanna to test how efficient this forum is?

And what are your findings dear sir?

Are we efficient at detecting homework questions or not? :P
 

Offline Chemistry4me

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 7709
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #7 on: 24/01/2012 22:35:41 »
What is the answer to 3? I have not tested this out ::)
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #8 on: 24/01/2012 23:48:56 »
I've always thought that being sick was the body's reaction to make a non-favorable environment for the bugs, as well as ramping up the metabolism against the attack.

Certainly some diseases cause higher fevers than others including Malaria, as well as Meningitis, and CSF infections.  For the temperature, it is generally recommended to give comfort care... more blankets if one feels cold, fewer if one feels hot...  except in the case of very high fevers, in excess of 105F which may require actual cooling of the body.  Antipyretic medications can be helpful too.

One pint (1 lb) of water at 32F may help a bit, but if a person weighs 150 lbs, the effect will be minimal.

Hmm, how would I calculate it...

100F-32F = 68F difference * (1/150) = 0.45F

Anyway, so a pint of icewater might drop your temperature by about 1/2F, or 1/4C which is significant, but it may not last very long depending on the underlying cause of the fever.
 

Offline Sprool

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 120
    • View Profile
Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #9 on: 25/01/2012 16:04:12 »
"Fever is a defense that the body uses to kill viruses and other germs. We know that germs growing in cultures die if you turn up the temperature too much. The same is happening in your body when your brain turns up the temperature when you get sick. We also know that the white blood cells and other protective mechanisms in the body work more efficiently at higher temperatures. Getting a fever is an important part of your body's defense against infection."
Now what is the mechanism whereby the body temperature gets hotter? Do all the cells start burning more energy together in the Mitochondria?
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: mixing water activity
« Reply #9 on: 25/01/2012 16:04:12 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums