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Author Topic: Could gravity be a repulsive force rather than attractive?  (Read 1865 times)

Offline Bamboozled

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Although I'm a super NooB I did read the post 'How do we know that gravity is an attractive force?' but it was quite old and the users on it may be dead and gone by now so apologies if I am stepping on any toes by starting a new one.
Anyway, I've been thinking about gravity a lot lately. My internet search revealed that in all honesty 'Nobody really knows' but I'm going to ask anyway.
I was wondering if gravity could be a universally repulsive force similar to that displayed by electromagnetism when poles are reversed.
In the case of gravity, however, could matter (and to a far lesser extent photons) act as a shield or a sail capturing gravity by not allowing it to pass through but instead exert force on it. IE the greater the atomic weight of a particle or object the more resistance it offers to gravitational force.
In the case of gases their atoms are dispersed so gravity passes through them without exerting that much force on them whereas when the same particles are frozen or compressed into solids there are more particles closer together which means gravity is unable to pass through them and therefore exerts a far greater force on the object giving it a greater weight.
In the case of a black hole anomolly the particles become so dense the gravitational force has no way to pass through the object and the entire weight of the universe perhaps creates an inversion scenario of some sort where the compressed particles are destroyed to become gravity itself along with other forms of energy.
It would also explain why we cannot 'see' the socalled dark matter that makes up so much of the universe. Anyway, its just a thought but I'd love to know what somebody who has really studied this stuff thinks.


 

Offline Pmb

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The inflationary universe is an example of antigravity. Another example of antigravity is the accelerating expansion of the universe. This is a universal expansion, however. There is no experimental evidence for local antigravity that we have evidence for.
 

Offline RD

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... In the case of gravity, however, could matter (and to a far lesser extent photons) act as a shield or a sail capturing gravity by not allowing it to pass through but instead exert force on it.

sounds like Le Sage's [failed] theory of gravitation ... http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=38592.msg354013#msg354013
« Last Edit: 30/04/2012 01:10:06 by RD »
 

Offline Bamboozled

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Thanks for that although I am proposing a universal pressure rather than a linear one it's nice to know I'm not the only one who has considered this.
I actually posted this in the wrong place initially and it appears to have been moved so I'd like to close this topic and continue with the other, more correctly placed one at:

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=44001.0
 

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