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Author Topic: Could photons slowly loose energy?  (Read 1661 times)

Offline CliffordK

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Could photons slowly loose energy?
« on: 13/05/2012 06:14:44 »
The higher the frequency of light, the higher the energy.
The lower the frequency, the lower the energy.

Is it possible that as light travels through space, it slowly looses energy, so that every billion years or so, it would loose a few percent of its energy?


 

Offline imatfaal

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Re: Could photons slowly loose energy?
« Reply #1 on: 14/05/2012 10:39:07 »
Cliff - two answers

1. through our space - Yes it does, background space is expanding, this lengthens the wavelength of photon transiting
2. static space - Not as far as I can tell.  Light does not wear out.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Could photons slowly loose energy?
« Reply #2 on: 16/05/2012 07:46:43 »
Yes...
I guess this was my question...  more or less.

Rather than space expanding, could photons simply be loosing energy, and thus slowly red-shifting with distance, at a rate so slight that it would be nearly impossible to observe on Earth?

Then, the question comes up as where does the energy go? 
If Aether, Fabric of Space, Whatever, can not radiate energy, then what happens if it absorbs energy.

Or, maybe that is the explanation for "stretching".  Red-shifting could be a combination of transferring energy from photons to space, and this energy being manifest as a "stretch".
 

Offline MikeS

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Re: Could photons slowly loose energy?
« Reply #3 on: 26/05/2012 10:28:21 »
If a photon is not subject to time, how can it change (and loose energy)?

As I understand it, there are three possibilities to explain the red shift.
1) photons loose energy.
2) space is expanding.
3) time is contracting.
« Last Edit: 26/05/2012 10:35:50 by MikeS »
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Could photons slowly loose energy?
« Reply #4 on: 28/05/2012 23:01:26 »
It's one tricky question, isn't it :)

On one hand we expect a energy quanta to be itself, unchanging.
On the other hand, introducing a expanding space we define it as 'doing work', in some mysterious way interacting with 'space' as it must do to be red shifted. If it does so, can it be intrinsically 'time less'? But a red shift is also a description from a wave definition, as I've seen it that is?

What do a light quanta need to 'red shift'?
How many 'frames of reference' are needed?
 

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Re: Could photons slowly loose energy?
« Reply #4 on: 28/05/2012 23:01:26 »

 

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