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Author Topic: gravity  (Read 3290 times)

Offline ukmicky

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gravity
« on: 03/06/2006 17:06:40 »
Does gravity contain information.

I suppose it must do as it is restricted to the speed of light, however can someone explain somehow how it works. what information does gravity hold on to and how

Michael
« Last Edit: 03/06/2006 17:31:25 by ukmicky »


 

another_someone

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Re: gravity
« Reply #1 on: 03/06/2006 18:21:44 »
If A has a consistent and predictable effect on B, then information must be transmitted between A and B.  The more complex the effect A has on B, the more information must be transmitted between them.

If A has a gravitational field that alters the motion of B, then A must be transmitting information to B.



George
 

Offline DocN

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Re: gravity
« Reply #2 on: 04/06/2006 17:28:45 »
How does mass which determines spacetime curature and, therefore gravitation contain such information?
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another_someone

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Re: gravity
« Reply #3 on: 04/06/2006 17:54:58 »
quote:
Originally posted by DocN
How does mass which determines spacetime curature and, therefore gravitation contain such information?



If one looks at a computer system, you would not question that a computer system contains information, and yet all that a computer system is is a complex of electrical and magnetic fields that are sensed and moved as required.

Both the value of the mass itself, it location in space and time, and its velocity, are all information that all matter contains, and the gravitational field (i.e. the curvature of space-time around all matter) merely transmit this information.



George
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: gravity
« Reply #4 on: 04/06/2006 20:52:25 »
quote:
if A has a gravitational field that alters the motion of B, then A must be transmitting information to B.
but how .

« Last Edit: 04/06/2006 21:56:51 by ukmicky »
 

another_someone

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Re: gravity
« Reply #5 on: 04/06/2006 21:23:49 »
quote:
Originally posted by ukmicky

quote:
if A has a gravitational field that alters the motion of B, then A must be transmitting information to B.
BUT HOW



Are you asking what is gravity?

I would guess that a crude analogy would be to regard gravity as a string connecting two weights in order to keep the string under tension.  A string under tension can transmit information in all sorts of ways.  The tension can tell you about about the direction and strength of the force at the other end, as well as transmit any vibration that exists at the other end.



George
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: gravity
« Reply #6 on: 04/06/2006 21:56:34 »
It’s a difficult one to understand. if gravity pushed then as a force it would easier to understand but as we can't view gravity is hard to understand how it holds onto and uses the information.


I could understand it if the fabric of space was the messenger and the holder of the information rather than gravity, as the presence of mass alters space and therefore changes the information contained within the fabric of space.

A thought if mass object {a} contained a force which repulsed space thinning it out and lowering its density or energy level allowing object B to follow a course of less resistance then gravity as it stands wouldn’t need to contain information

Michael



Michael
 

another_someone

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Re: gravity
« Reply #7 on: 04/06/2006 22:25:11 »
quote:
Originally posted by ukmicky

It’s a difficult one to understand. if gravity pushed then as a force it would easier to understand but as we can't view gravity is hard to understand how it holds onto and uses the information.


I could understand it if the fabric of space was the messenger and the holder of the information rather than gravity, as the presence of mass alters space and therefore changes the information contained within the fabric of space.

A thought if mass object {a} contained a force which repulsed space thinning it out and lowering its density or energy level allowing object B to follow a course of less resistance then gravity as it stands wouldn’t need to contain information



Not sure that the push or pull issue makes any difference, it is the tension/force that is the means of transmitting the information.

OK, strictly speaking, I suppose my response was a little inaccurate.  Gravity itself does not contain information, but is a medium through which information is transmitted.  It is like the string in my example above, the string does not store, or utilise, information; it merely provides a medium through which information can be transmitted.

Arguably, it is matter that contains the information (it is matter that has a state and a position), but gravity is one of many forces through which matter can transmit information between itself and other matter.



George
« Last Edit: 04/06/2006 22:27:13 by another_someone »
 

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Re: gravity
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