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Author Topic: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?  (Read 2973 times)

Offline @/antic

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Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« on: 06/07/2012 21:37:20 »
Would love to know your thoughts.


 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #1 on: 07/07/2012 01:18:07 »
An aether without friction maybe :)
Although most of our modern thought build on what we normally expect to be true. We want 'action and reaction' to be present even when we can't measure it. And? I don't know, maybe that is correct, but when you leave the experiments and instead start to define reality from 'weak measuring' assuming 'action and reaction' to be present you also leave what science has built on for the longest time.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #2 on: 07/07/2012 09:45:40 »
We tend to forget that there is "friction" in gravitational motion but it is so tiny that in almost all circumstances that it is totally undetectable.  All bodies interacting under gravity emit gravitational waves and this gravitational energy loss is just detectable in the orbital periods of close pairs of neutron stars (or black holes) and causes them to slowly spiral towards each other increasing their orbital speed.

This energy loss can be considered to be similar to the electromagnetic radiation emitted by electrons orbiting a nucleus however quantum effects prevent this happening at certain resonance positions creating the electron orbitals.  It is interesting to consider that there must be similar rules for tiny neutral but massive particles interacting purely under gravity. It should be possible to make some calculations as to what these resonances would be.  They would probably be around or within the planck limits of time and distance

Back on topic. The virtual Higgs particle field, it cannot be real because the Higgs particles decay in the current environment,  is a bit like the ether but clearly cannot allow any absolute measurements to measure a velocity with respect to this field.  Remember the ether was considered to be a medium through which light travelled.
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #3 on: 11/07/2012 19:40:12 »
Ahh, wish I knew what to think there Soul Surfer :)
Even Einstein changed his mind a couple of times on that 'matter', although he agreed to the possible existence of gravitational waves in his later days. I too think of it as existing, but is it a 'friction'? Then there should be excess heat present somewhere in the 'system' shouldn't it? Or is that me thinking wrong here?

When I think of a warped SpaceTime it's somewhat of a 'medium' to me, but without friction?
 

Offline David Cooper

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #4 on: 11/07/2012 21:49:47 »
If you're going down the aether route, it might be better to think of the Higgs field as being a property of the aether/fabric-of-space, just like any other kind of field. To equate it with the aether would be to strip the aether of all its other vital functionality.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #5 on: 11/07/2012 23:15:38 »
Yor-on  let me explain what I mean by gravitational "friction"  a normal body of material (solid, liquid or gas) if it is warm contains heat energy and this is radiated in the form of electromagnetic radiation.  This radiation comes as a result of the acceleration of the atoms as they bump into each other. if it is sitting in a cold universe this energy can escape and it cools down because of this energy loss.  If we have particles or lumps of material (even atoms) interacting under gravity they emit gravitational radiation and loose energy however in the current environment this energy loss is incredibly small and would only start to become significant for gravitational interactions with time periods similar to electromagnetic ones.
 

Offline Heikki Rinnemaa

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #6 on: 14/07/2012 06:46:58 »
 :)

Higgs-particle is one named matter-particle which is smaller than atom-theory gives atom,,and not a field.

Space is full of matter--so called ether,,,and there is many more particles than Higgs-particle.


Human think that atom was smallest matter-particle,,and now is maybe proved that atom is not smallest particle,,so what then?

This dont help us do solve two problem;
- How matter born pure emptyness,,?
- How matter can live,,thing,,be,,?

So ether is back and matter and space is still near and faraway. Wondering continuee,, :)

 

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Re: Could one liken a Higgs Field to an ether?
« Reply #6 on: 14/07/2012 06:46:58 »

 

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