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Author Topic: Can nanoparticles be dangerous in our environment?  (Read 2530 times)

Offline thedoc

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What are the environmental dangers of
nanoparticles?  They're a fraction the size of a human hair, so could they have an impact on health or on the environment? Richard Hollingham finds out...
Read a transcript of the interview by clicking here

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« Last Edit: 10/07/2012 15:16:53 by _system »


 

Offline tkadm30

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Re: Can nanoparticles be dangerous in our environment?
« Reply #1 on: 29/06/2016 11:26:25 »
Exposure to coal fly ash nanoparticles from clandestine geoengineering activity may induce cellular toxicity and oxidative DNA damage.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26548078
 

Offline tkadm30

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Re: Can nanoparticles be dangerous in our environment?
« Reply #2 on: 29/06/2016 11:57:35 »
http://www.indjsrt.com/administrator/modules/category/upload/06-INDJSRT20160413.pdf

Quote
OBTAINING EVIDENCE OF COAL FLY ASH CONTENT IN WEATHER MODIFICATION (GEOENGINEERING) THROUGH ANALYSES OF POST-AEROSOL-SPRAYING RAINWATER AND SOLID SUBSTANCES

Abstract
Since the late 1990s tanker jets have been spraying particulate matter into the troposphere with no disclosure of the chemical compositions which mix with the air people breathe. Using forensic chemical methodologies, I discovered and published evidence that the  main aerosolized component is coal combustion fly ash, a toxic nightmare. One of the  methodologies  used  involves  comparison  of  elements  dissolved  in  rainwater,  presumably  leached  from  the aerosol  particulates,  with  laboratory  data  on  the  water-leachate  of  European  coal  fly  ash  samples.  Here  I  describe that methodology so that others can utilize and extend it. Another of the methodologies involves direct comparison of  elements  analyzed  in  solid  substances  with  corresponding  elements  analyzed  in  coal  fly  ash  samples.  I  also describe that methodology, indicate some potential materials of interest, and point out possible limitations.
 

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Re: Can nanoparticles be dangerous in our environment?
« Reply #2 on: 29/06/2016 11:57:35 »

 

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