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Author Topic: what makes electron negative charged itself?  (Read 3297 times)

Offline rocking_1987

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what makes electron negative charged itself?
« on: 03/08/2012 18:18:55 »
Hi,


Is it possible to make electron neutral? I mean is it possible to extract the negative charge of the electron? Is it unlimited? I mean it will be always be negative no matter what you do with it?

Why electron does not lose its electric charge in any reaction? Is the negative charge of the electron is sort of energy? What makes electron negativly charged itself?

When one reaction occur, there will be some energy wastage right? Why it does not happens to the electron or proton's positive charge?



« Last Edit: 03/08/2012 18:30:25 by rocking_1987 »


 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Re: what makes electron negative charged itself?
« Reply #1 on: 03/08/2012 22:43:22 »
The negative charge on an electron is a fundamental property of it and if it did not have it it would not be an electron but something else.  For example electrons are part of a family of particles called leptons,  it has a negative charge a lepton with no charge is called a neutrino and a lepton with a positive charge is a positron the anti particle of an electron   there are however three generations of particles called leptons you can thing of them as the  low medium and high energy versions.  The electron is the low energy the mu meson the medium and the tau meson the high energy version.
 

Offline imatfaal

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Re: what makes electron negative charged itself?
« Reply #2 on: 04/08/2012 16:14:52 »
Just one point to clarify Soulsurfers - the bigger brothers of the electron are the muon and the tau.  Historically they were called the mu-meson and the tau-meson; but this name is confusing now.  mesons are formed by a quark and an anti-quark - whereas the muon and tau are elementary; ie they do not have any substructure.

You are better off thinking of them as the muon and the tau - and remembering that they are unit negative charge leptons and elementary particles. 
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Re: what makes electron negative charged itself?
« Reply #3 on: 05/08/2012 10:13:12 »
I agree.   Sorry my age betrays me.  My subatomic physics was first learned in the days when all particle lighter than a proton and heavier than an electron were described as mesons.   :)
« Last Edit: 05/08/2012 10:16:55 by Soul Surfer »
 

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Re: what makes electron negative charged itself?
« Reply #3 on: 05/08/2012 10:13:12 »

 

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