The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: What Would Happen If All The Iron In the Body Was Immediately Removed ?  (Read 4174 times)

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Dearest Academics Of Awe Inspiring Scienceness,


As a sheepy I of course luff to iron. Ironing is all I think about. Yep, It monopolises my every waking thought.   

Look here's an Iron literally just moments ago before ewe read this far to see it.


An Iron Literally Just Moments Ago After Ewe Have Now Seen It !

Now, (lol)..apparently there is a very small one of these inside me...lol....travelling up and down and around my body !...loool !!...Ridiculous I know !...ewe have one too !!...guffaw guffaw chortle !! *falls to floor hysterically laughing reaching for gasps of air*


Ok...ok !!......Anyway,.......lets say for some reason this little iron was immediately removed form the body...One second it's there..the next it's all gorrrrn !!

What would happen ?

Would the urge to press clothes immediately diminish ?

What would be the effect on the body ?..symptoms  please ?

What does the iron do anyway apart from make sure I have nicely pressed blood cells ?


Thank ewe for your cooperation in this matter !

Hugs and shmishes


mwah mwah mwah !!




Neil
I Might have Got it Wrong..Could It Be A Golf Iron Instead ?
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx











 

Offline Nizzle

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 964
  • Thanked: 1 times
  • Extropian by choice!
    • View Profile
    • Carnivorous Plants
Iron is a critical component in Hemoglobin, a protein composed molecule in Red Blood cells. If the body would instantly lose all it's iron contents, one of the consequences would be the partial unfolding of Hemoglobin molecules and they would lose their ability to exchange O2 at the blood-lung barrier or hold on to the O2 in the bloodstream. Basically, your whole body would start to become oxygen deprived and die.
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Iron is a critical component in Hemoglobin, a protein composed molecule in Red Blood cells. If the body would instantly lose all it's iron contents, one of the consequences would be the partial unfolding of Hemoglobin molecules and they would lose their ability to exchange O2 at the blood-lung barrier or hold on to the O2 in the bloodstream. Basically, your whole body would start to become oxygen deprived and die.

Thanks Nizzle

So we'd effectively suffocate !!...sheesh !

Does this mean we are partially magnetic ?...and is Iron in other animals too ?
 

Offline schneebfloob

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 49
    • View Profile
As mentioned, iron ions are a critical component of haemoglobin and myoglobin. Without it you would die. This is the case for other organisms that utilise haem groups to carry oxygen.

Metal ions have many other purposes in the body, however. For example, there are a group of critical enzymes in the body called the "zinc-finger" enzymes, which utilise zinc ions to help co-ordinate reactions. Likewise, there are many enzymes that utilise magnesium, manganese, copper or zinc. Removal of any of these metal ions from the body would probably cause death in one way or another.

 On a slight sidenote, in relation to the magnetism thing, through fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) it is possible to detect minute changes in the conformation of the haem group when oxygen is bound -- fMRI can distinguish between oxygenated and de-oxygenated blood flow, and highlight regions where blood supply is increased (eg in the brain). This is related to magnetics.  :)
« Last Edit: 30/08/2012 16:56:29 by schneebfloob »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
As mentioned, iron ions are a critical component of haemoglobin and myoglobin. Without it you would die. This is the case for other organisms that utilise haem groups to carry oxygen.

Metal ions have many other purposes in the body, however. For example, there are a group of critical enzymes in the body called the "zinc-finger" enzymes, which utilise zinc ions to help co-ordinate reactions. Likewise, there are many enzymes that utilise magnesium, manganese, copper or zinc. Removal of any of these metal ions from the body would probably cause death in one way or another.

 On a slight sidenote, in relation to the magnetism thing, through fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) it is possible to detect minute changes in the conformation of the haem group when oxygen is bound -- fMRI can distinguish between oxygenated and de-oxygenated blood flow, and highlight regions where blood supply is increased (eg in the brain). This is related to magnetics.  :)

Thank you very much indeed for this useful information schneebfloob (welcome to the site...great name !)

Gosh !...we're a veritable Aladdins' Cave !..I don't sheepose we have any precious metals in us too ?..and if so...what do they do ? (apart from fill your teeth)
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8661
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Some cells- like white blood cells would get by without myoglobin or haemoglobin as long as they were in a medium with enough dissolved oxygen.
But removing the iron from their cytochromes would kill them anyway.
 

Offline schneebfloob

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 49
    • View Profile
Precious metals tend to be relatively unreactive, when compared to other transition metals. For this reason, in enzymes it's probably more beneficial to have ions of different metals incorporated (metals in enzymes are used to move electrons around). There might be other reasons too.

Having said that, platinum is a component of the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.
« Last Edit: 30/08/2012 19:19:19 by schneebfloob »
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Some cells- like white blood cells would get by without myoglobin or haemoglobin as long as they were in a medium with enough dissolved oxygen.
But removing the iron from their cytochromes would kill them anyway.

Nice !..Thank you very much BC
 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Precious metals tend to be relatively unreactive, when compared to other transition metals. For this reason, in enzymes it's probably more beneficial to have ions of different metals incorporated (metals in enzymes are used to move electrons around). There might be other reasons too.

Having said that, platinum is a component of the chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

Why ?..is Platinum some form of catalyst then ?...I presume it's "passed Through"  ?.....Sorry...hope you don't mind my curiosity !
 

Offline schneebfloob

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 49
    • View Profile
In cisplatin the platinum is being used to form crosslinks between DNA strands.Cancer cells replicate quickly, and hence the DNA also replicates frequently. By forming links between the strands, cisplatin stops this from happening. This triggers the cell to try and repair the damage, and it can't do it, for whatever reason. I don't know whether the bonds with platinum can't be broken, or whether enzyme access to the DNA is blocked completely. Regardless, because it can't fix the problem the cell initiates apoptosis and kills itself. Pretty cool  :)

 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
In cisplatin the platinum is being used to form crosslinks between DNA strands.Cancer cells replicate quickly, and hence the DNA also replicates frequently. By forming links between the strands, cisplatin stops this from happening. This triggers the cell to try and repair the damage, and it can't do it, for whatever reason. I don't know whether the bonds with platinum can't be broken, or whether enzyme access to the DNA is blocked completely. Regardless, because it can't fix the problem the cell initiates apoptosis and kills itself. Pretty cool  :)





Agreed...really kewl !...Thanks again schneebfloob ! (lol..luff the name)  ;D
 

Offline Lmnre

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 178
    • View Profile
The person would not only "turn blue", but also lose the healthy pinkish hue caused by the iron in the hemoglobin, resulting in a stranger blue hue ... like the Blue Man Group?

 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
The person would not only "turn blue", but also lose the healthy pinkish hue caused by the iron in the hemoglobin, resulting in a stranger blue hue ... like the Blue Man Group?




ha ha !!..They need some beet root stew !! [ ;)]



 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Iron is also used in myoglobin which gives somewhat of an aerobic reserve.  Of course, you still have breathing, but without the myoglobin, you would have a harder time getting the oxygen to your muscles when you need it, and would convert over to anaerobic exercise quicker.

As mentioned elsewhere, some animals including crabs and many insects have Cyanoglobin and Hemocyanin with copper rather than hemoglobin/myoglobin.  So, they would be less affected by a loss of iron.

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=44370.msg389956#msg389956

« Last Edit: 31/08/2012 17:41:06 by CliffordK »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums