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Author Topic: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein  (Read 1671 times)

Offline Emc2

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http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22230-two-dead-stars-provide-lowtech-way-to-test-einstein.html

According to Einstein's general relativity – the leading theory of gravity – accelerating objects, like stars orbiting one another, should create gravitational waves. The heavier they are, and the faster they're moving, the more powerful those waves. Crucially, this loss of energy causes the two objects to orbit closer together, an effect that can be detected.




  another interesting story.....


 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #1 on: 03/09/2012 10:40:58 »
Well, according to one interpretation that is. Einstein changed his mind several times on that one, about the existence of gravitational waves I mean. It was a interpretation from his equations that he hadn't thought through fully, as I remember it? Until someone else suggested it, and I don't remember who it was for the moment, and neither seems anyone else :) on the net? I have a vague recollection it had to do with the discussion of possible worm holes though, but I'm not sure.

 
Anyway, I know he changed his mind several times there, although in the end accepting it as a prediction.

Gravitational waves.
==

Maybe I'm in error there?
Still can't find the reference to it who first suggested gravitational waves, those I've found all seem to say that it was Einstein that made it a prediction from the beginning, although later with Nathan Rosen changing his view, to then change it again :)..

But this one seems a nice historical review Sticky bead argument.
« Last Edit: 03/09/2012 11:14:35 by yor_on »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #2 on: 03/09/2012 12:02:44 »
In 1993, Russell Hulse and Joe Taylor were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for indirectly detecting gravitational waves from a pulsar in a binary system. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_wave#Radiation_from_other_sources

Certainly, finding a system which is closer to us, and in a closer orbit, makes it much easier to study.
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #3 on: 06/09/2012 04:17:41 »
What about magnetic attraction? Did they take this into account? A nobel prize is not a proof! You may have the effect without the main theoretical cause. Many physicists say that they should already have detected it directly but they didn't. If they have build detectors of gravitational waves, it is because they expected to measure them...

It is Einstein that proposed gravitational waves but he doubted the possibility to measure them and he was not totally convinced of their existence. Gravitational waves, as theorized, can only exist if GR spacetime is real. Entanglement seems to show that spacetime is not the true explanation of space and time...

 
« Last Edit: 06/09/2012 05:01:36 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline damocles

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #4 on: 06/09/2012 04:55:17 »
What about magnetic attraction? Did they take this into account? A nobel prize is not a proof! You may have the effect without the main theoretical cause. Many physicists say that they should already have detected it directly but they didn't. If they have build detectors of gravitational waves, it is because they expected to measure them...
 


Although a Nobel Prize is indeed not a proof, it does indicate that a jury consisting of about a dozen of Europe's most eminent scientists, who were able to consult with others, felt that on balance of probabilities it was proof. Certainly a phenomenon as familiar and well understood as magnetic attraction would have been taken into account.
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #5 on: 06/09/2012 05:06:57 »
They didn't because they don't know enough about the magnetic field's intensity. Even our sun's magnetic field is not well known. Latests evidences demonstrate that there is something wrong with the standard model of stars. Probably a superfluid ring inside stars, specially evident in neutron stars... :o)
« Last Edit: 06/09/2012 05:10:36 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #6 on: 06/09/2012 07:10:47 »
The Nobel prize may be deserved, because they may have proved GR. But to conclude that it is a proof for gravitational wave is wrong. There is no gravitational wave because there is no spacetime. Spacetime is not real and it is why Physics has not advanced beyond Einstein in the domain of Relativity. If Einstein was still alive...
« Last Edit: 06/09/2012 08:02:40 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #7 on: 06/09/2012 07:57:05 »
After reading this great article, i have mixed feelings. If the orbital motions are oscillating according to GR, there should be oscillations in the gravitational field, even if there is no spacetime. There will be certainly ripples in the timerate but i doubt ripples in length due to gravitational oscillations. I think that length contractions may only be observed in longitudinal motion. Gravity may be due to transverse rotational motion of elementary particles. In the transverse motion, there is no length contraction... This will prove my theory if combined with full measurement of the transverse doppler shift... Now i can go to sleep... if i can... :o)


http://www.ligo.caltech.edu/docs/P/P060074-00.pdf
 

Offline damocles

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #8 on: 06/09/2012 08:00:43 »
You can sleep easy CPT! Your normal burglar alarm will detect any marauding gravitons with evil intent.

;D
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #9 on: 06/09/2012 08:05:51 »
i will try... |)



 

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Re: Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein
« Reply #9 on: 06/09/2012 08:05:51 »

 

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