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Author Topic: magnetism and gravity  (Read 2686 times)

Offline hubble_bubble

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magnetism and gravity
« on: 04/09/2012 08:30:39 »
If we take a bar magnet where internal currents generate the poles, much like in a solenoid, we see that this property of metals causes attractive and repulsive forces. This is to some degree due to the internal structure of the magnetic metals. It would be interesting to mathematically model the relationship of distance to strength of attraction to see if this fits with the mathematical model of gravity. Where the attractive force increases with a reduction of distance between objects. I am looking for any equations that may describe this for bar magnets. It would also be of interest to see how the size of magnet affects the attractive force and whether this can be associated with the increase in mass.

As the electromagnetic force is described by electric charge there may be an associated property of matter, maybe related to protons within the nucleus, that generates the attractive gravitational force, much as the electron field produces magnetism. The amplification factor would be directly proportional to mass.

Because all normal matter contains electrons and these electrons have some part to play in intermolecular bonding of solids then the electromagnetic fields may well interact with the accumulated and amplified positive charges within the total mass of nuclei to work together to produce the gravitational attraction. This may be why gases that do not have the accumulating net positive charge shown by solids are freer to roam in the atmosphere. This would indicate that solid matter amplifies gravitational attraction.

Temperature, as with heated gases, would have a more repulsive effect on the gravitational field. This would also explain why helium will rise as it will not make a solid and can never have an amplified gravitational field. All other elements exist as molecules and due to this fact always hold a slight gravitational 'charge' for want of a better word.


 

Offline hubble_bubble

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Re: magnetism and gravity
« Reply #1 on: 05/09/2012 04:47:37 »
The hydrogen molecule has a neutral net charge but also a very strong bond. At room temperature it exists as a gas. The electron sharing in the molecular bond is enough to produce the neutral charge. If there is a change in the balance of this net charge it is envisaged that an attractive force will be generated in order to balance the charges out. An energy drop in the orbiting electrons will result in a slight reduction in mass which could leave a minute positive charge. This positive potential charge could be considered the driving force behind solidification of matter. Sharing extra electrons within the solid structure is necessary to maintain the charge balance.

As the overall mass of a solid increases, so the total imbalance in any accumulative charge will increase. A massive enough solid would then tend to attract other matter towards it in order to restore the charge balance. This is true whether the net charge is positive or negative.

As a side note, if dark matter were in fact an expression of anti-matter, then the expansion of the universe could simply be the expression of opposing net charge imbalance.
 

Offline hubble_bubble

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Re: magnetism and gravity
« Reply #2 on: 05/09/2012 04:59:35 »
A good way to explore this concept is to study ionic bonding. The ionic bonds may not completely resolve the charge imbalance. Therefore the more ionic bonding within a solid the more potential attractive force.
 

Offline hubble_bubble

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Re: magnetism and gravity
« Reply #3 on: 05/09/2012 05:16:24 »
Here is a description of fluctuating dipoles that describe the charge imbalances.

http://www.chemguide.co.uk/atoms/bonding/vdw.html [nofollow]

The frequency of these imbalances should vary in frequency due to temperature, pressure and mass. These oscillations could be the source of gravity waves.
 

Offline hubble_bubble

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Re: magnetism and gravity
« Reply #4 on: 05/09/2012 05:22:58 »
Coulomb's law

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coulomb's_law [nofollow]

"Coulomb's law was officially published in 1785 by French physicist Charles Augustin de Coulomb and was essential to the development of the theory of electromagnetism.[1][2] He used a torsion balance to study the repulsion and attraction forces of charged particles and determined that the magnitude of the electric force between two point charges is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them."

Newton's law of universal gravitation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newton's_law_of_universal_gravitation [nofollow]

"Newton's law of universal gravitation states that every point mass in the universe attracts every other point mass with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them."

The striking thing here is the relationship of direct proportionality of magnitude and inverse proportionality of distance for both electromagnetic charge and gravitation.

The question is would it be possible to detect a positive electromagnetic field and if so how would this be done?
« Last Edit: 05/09/2012 05:26:07 by hubble_bubble »
 

Offline hubble_bubble

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Re: magnetism and gravity
« Reply #5 on: 05/09/2012 06:37:54 »
Phase shifting dipoles are those charges that are not synchronized. Some charges will be negative in a mass, some positive and others neutral. If the overall average between two masses are of the same magnitude then no net attraction will occur. In a system exhibiting a gravitational attraction there must be a general synchronization of dipole oscillation for the attractive force to act. However this introduces the problem of synchronization between masses at distance. If one masses exhibits the same polarity of charge at the same time as the remote mass then the force would be repulsive. It would need to be experimentally confirmed that such synchronization exists in dipole oscillation. This seems unlikely.
 

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Re: magnetism and gravity
« Reply #5 on: 05/09/2012 06:37:54 »

 

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