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Author Topic: Train Tracks - how trains go round corners - Kitchen Science  (Read 3958 times)

Offline thedoc

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Trains often have the wheels welded to their axles, so how do they go around corners? Find out with this experiment.

Read more about this kitchen science experiment.

Listen to the Experiment Part 1 Part 2
...or download as MP3 [1] [2]
« Last Edit: 20/03/2013 18:11:35 by _system »


 

Offline stustjohn

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I remember listening to Richard Feyman explaining this and thinking to myself, 'Wow, what a simple, yet elegant, solution to a very real problem.' And then I wondered why on Earth I had never even considered the problem before (never mind its solution)! Then I wondered how many other everyday situations are similar to this: simple science (that most children could probably understand) right under our noses, but that many of us completely miss...
 

Offline CliffordK

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Interesting.
There are strict guidelines on how much curvature the track can have, which is likely related to the maximum amount of curvature that the wheels can easily compensate for.
 

Offline Boogie

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Interesting.
There are strict guidelines on how much curvature the track can have, which is likely related to the maximum amount of curvature that the wheels can easily compensate for.

This is certainly true with short bodied ore cars and such.

Modern locomotives, however,  use "trucks" mounted at both ends of the car. Each truck typically has a two sets of wheels/axles fixed in place. The trucks can turn independently with the curvature of the track allowing sharper turns and looser guidlines in track construction.

Edit : The truck is sometimes called a Bogie. Not to be confused with a Boogie.
« Last Edit: 20/11/2012 22:44:56 by Boogie »
 

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