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Author Topic: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?  (Read 4490 times)

Offline evan_au

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Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« on: 23/11/2012 08:56:28 »
In the show on 18-Nov-2012, a comment was made that a burst of cortisol increases the level of glucose in the blood, for use by the flight/fight response.

Does that mean that people who are under continual stress have continually elevated glucose levels?
And isn't that a common symptom of diabetes?
So could stress cause or exacerbate diabetes?
« Last Edit: 23/11/2012 09:38:53 by evan_au »


 

Offline RE.Craig

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Re: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« Reply #1 on: 12/02/2013 18:11:15 »
I have had type one diabetes for over 30 years. If I get annoyed I can actually feel my adrenalin glands pumping away and causing pain in my kidneys. The first and most obvious effect it has on a diabetic is to rapidly drop his blood sugar levels down to hypoglycaemic levels which causes very stressful and frequently uncontrollable rash behaviour and if untreated with glucose unconsciousness. Occasionally the opposite can happen and the blood sugar level will rapidly rise to hyperglycaemic levels, this is caused by the adrenalin activating glycogen, which is a type of glucose stored in the liver. When a person unaffected by Type 1 diabetes experiences stress or the fight or flight scenario their pancreas automatically stops pumping insulin into the blood stream. A diabetic is handicapped in this sense since their insulin injection regime means that there is always insulin in the blood and they are unable to "turn it of" so to speak. All of this has the effect of making diabetics prone to "flying of the handle" and living in a "high stress mode" which unfortunately makes them very susceptible to strokes, heart and kidney failure and aneurysms not to mention much more likely to pick up and die from infections that most people easily "dust off". 
 

Offline RD

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Re: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« Reply #2 on: 12/02/2013 19:53:34 »
... All of this has the effect of making diabetics prone to "flying of the handle" and living in a "high stress mode" which unfortunately makes them very susceptible to strokes, heart and kidney failure and aneurysms ...

There is a very strong association between diabetes and vascular disease.
The orthodox view is that it's diabetes which causes the vasculopathy , (some say it is the other way round).

Vascular disease is the cause of stroke / heart-attack / retinopathy / nephropathy / neuropathy which are unduly common in those with type-1 diabetes. 

People who have had a stroke (including a silent one) can suffer from emotional incontinence as a consequence. So-called “apoplectic rage”, is loss-of-temper-type emotional incontinence caused by brain injury as a consequence of the stroke,  rather than "flying off the handle" causing a stroke.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudobulbar_affect#Prevalence_in_patients_with_stroke
« Last Edit: 12/02/2013 20:22:00 by RD »
 

Offline cheryl j

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Re: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« Reply #3 on: 13/02/2013 01:30:31 »
That's interesting. I did know that the sympathetic nervous system and flight or fight respoinse affects blood sugar levels, but I never considered what effect it would have for diabetics.
 

Offline Minerva

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Re: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« Reply #4 on: 15/02/2013 11:28:42 »
I offer part of this as anecdotal evidence only as the assumption that type 2 diabetes is caused by liver damage.  I have recently had Hep C - a virus that attacks and causes cirrhosis of the liver because of this I experienced insulin resistance/glucose intolerance (which would have led to type 2 diabetes) and various nutritional deficiencies (plus other auto immune effects).  Before diagnosis and diet change/treatment I too was like Craig.  I had spent 42 years being a fairly placid person but became quite irate at the most minor things and the physical sensations that accompanied them were very specific.  My back would start to pinch just below my ribs and my liver would flutter and it felt like my digestive system was shrinking and I would get so thirsty and dry and itchy.

I have a long distance relationship with a stress monster and he has been stressing almost non-stop since his divorce about 10 years ago.  He eats a fairly healthy diet, certainly not one full of sugar and grains and processed foods but started showing signs of insulin resistance, red sore eyes, lethargy, thirsty etc..  Blood glucose readings were too high after meals also. Recent bloods showed liver function was way too high and it was clear his liver was severely stressed with him. (Its almost sorted with diet and other changes now though).

I think stressing damages the liver by running too high all the time -  like a car run at full throttle will wear out quicker.  The effects of liver damage will be the same in everyone though however its caused because it performs the same functions in all of us.  And liver damage is usually followed by metabolic/nutritional/digestive/auto-immune disorders and if unchecked, death.

Hildebrandt et al showed how patients who were classed as being of submissive demeanour by psychologists were more likely to reject a liver transplant even when other factors were taken into consideration.  It has even been suggested by some that becoming a grumpy old git should be recognised as a symptom of being less tolerant of glucose.  Mood and metabolism are intrinsically linked and in my opinion the direction of causation is a two-way street.

See here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2702105/

http://www.liversupport.com/wordpress/2011/04/five-signs-you-and-your-liver-need-stress-relief/

Look after your liver folks....its important and its not nice when it goes wrong.
« Last Edit: 15/02/2013 11:38:07 by Minerva »
 

Offline Minerva

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Re: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« Reply #5 on: 15/02/2013 11:35:26 »
See also
“Does Stress Exacerbate Liver Disease?,” Yoichi Chida, Nobuyuki Sudo and Chiharu Kubo. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 20 (2006) 202- 208
 

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Re: Stress->Cortisol->Glucose->Diabetes?
« Reply #5 on: 15/02/2013 11:35:26 »

 

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