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Author Topic: What would/could be the fundamental physical origin of the Gaussian?  (Read 1107 times)

Offline zordim

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Well, the question is in the title.
So, what would/could it be?


 

Offline RD

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If you mean Gaussian distribution, regular arrays (like the packing of atoms) can produce a normal distribution pattern ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bean_machine
 

Offline zordim

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What do you think about the following derivation of energy distribution of a localized energy whirl:
In any radial direction away from center, the energy decreases. At each point 4b43b0aee35624cd95b910189b3dc231.gif, energy has a certain value 15f7a24e580a3b7e47bd0dc90d633275.gif. Along the radius, the energy does change: bc6f0ea06069706b714d9fded40dcb84.gif. This is force, by definition.
At some given radius 4b43b0aee35624cd95b910189b3dc231.gif, that force has a certain value 268d2ff548db6335dbe02fb498c0ba7f.gif. Both force and energy do not change along the circle of that given radius 4b43b0aee35624cd95b910189b3dc231.gif. And that is the case in each given value 4b43b0aee35624cd95b910189b3dc231.gif of a radius, along which energy is distributed. Hence:

1cf36caf5c2bc300c56fe0777359df38.gif
fd35bc62058000e528df64f2ee4f0fb9.gif
1f98f127f9281c21e7283cb7fb6e6249.gif
 

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