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Author Topic: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?  (Read 4790 times)

Offline neilep

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Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« on: 22/06/2006 14:07:52 »
How can there be a Solar Wind in the vacuum of space ?

...does the same apply to shock-waves too ?

Men are the same as women, just inside out !
« Last Edit: 22/06/2006 14:30:24 by neilep »


 

Offline tony6789

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #1 on: 22/06/2006 14:36:56 »
neil solar wind is mearly a term like the term "solar weather" solar wind or weather refers to radiation of the sun. Every once in a while the sun gives off a big explosion into space called a solar flare. after a while the solar flare is no longer visible but the radiation is still there. i hope this helps u out

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another_someone

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #2 on: 22/06/2006 14:52:51 »
There is no such thing as a perfect vacuum.  Even interstellar space, and no doubt intergalactic space, contains some matter, just very little of it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum#Outer_space
quote:

Much of outer space has the density and pressure of an almost perfect vacuum. It has effectively no friction. The properties of the vacuum remain largely unknown.
A perfect vacuum is an ideal state that cannot practically be obtained in a laboratory, not even in outer space, where there are a few hydrogen atoms per cubic centimeter at 10#8722;14 pascal or 10#8722;16 Torr.
All of the observable universe is also filled with large numbers of photons, the so-called cosmic background radiation, and quite likely a correspondingly large number of neutrinos. The current temperature is about 3 K, being merely 3 kelvins or degrees Celsius above the absolute zero of temperature. Neither these photons nor the neutrinos produce a significant interaction with matter, so stars, planets and spacecraft move freely in this near perfect vacuum of interstellar space.
Stars, planets and moons keep their atmosphere by gravitational attraction, so atmospheres have no firm boundary. The density of gas decreases with distance from the object. In Low Earth Orbit (about 300 km altitude) the atmospheric density is still sufficient to produce significant drag on satellites. Most Earth satellites operate in this region, and they need to fire their engines every few days to maintain orbit.
Beyond planetary atmospheres, the pressure from photons and other particles from the sun become significant. Spacecraft can be buffeted by solar winds, but planets are too massive to be affected. The idea of using this wind with a solar sail has been proposed for interplanetary travel.
The deep vacuum of space could make it an attractive environment for certain processes, for instance those that require ultraclean surfaces.
In 1913, Norwegian explorer and physicist Kristian Birkeland may have been the first to predict that space is not only a plasma, but also contains "dark matter". He wrote: "It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. We have assumed that each stellar system in evolutions throws off electric corpuscles into space. It does not seem unreasonable therefore to think that the greater part of the material masses in the universe is found, not in the solar systems or nebulae, but in "empty" space.





George
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #3 on: 22/06/2006 15:10:59 »
Thank You tony..yes that helps.

Thank you George. I can see now how an absolute vacuum is an unatainable circumstance.

Though...the circumstances may prevail for such a void somewhere in the Universe...






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Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #4 on: 23/06/2006 00:10:52 »
quote:
Originally posted by another_someone

There is no such thing as a perfect vacuum.  Even interstellar space, and no doubt intergalactic space, contains some matter, just very little of it.

quote:
Originally posted by neilep

Thank You tony..yes that helps.

Thank you George. I can see now how an absolute vacuum is an unatainable circumstance.

Though...the circumstances may prevail for such a void somewhere in the Universe...


......UKMickeys head !!! for instance..hee hee..shhhh don't tell him I said that !!..hee hee :D

Men are the same as women, just inside out!

Empirical study time.:) Iíve got an interview and an assessment tomorrow for a managerial position during which the conditions for creating a perfect vacuum in my head should be optimum.

Hopefully for me and the future of mankind George is correct in his assertions,as I don't think my cranium is thick enough to withstand the pressure of a perfect vacuum.
(you best be right George)

Neil I shall let you know for certain tomorrow after the results come in ,but judging by all the neuron or should i say neurotic activity going on in their tonight as I wait nervously I feel you could definatly be wrong.

I HOPE :)


Michael
« Last Edit: 23/06/2006 00:29:45 by ukmicky »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #5 on: 23/06/2006 00:27:46 »
DOH !!..you saw it...sorry chum !! :D..I think you know it goes without saying that I am the token ' empty head ' around here !

GOOD LUCK for tomorrow !!



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Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #6 on: 23/06/2006 00:34:07 »
Cheers Neil :)

Michael
 

Offline science_guy

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #7 on: 23/06/2006 08:20:53 »
quote:
Empirical study time. Iíve got an interview and an assessment tomorrow for a managerial position during which the conditions for creating a perfect vacuum in my head should be optimum.

Hopefully for me and the future of mankind George is correct in his assertions,as I don't think my cranium is thick enough to withstand the pressure of a perfect vacuum.
(you best be right George)

Neil I shall let you know for certain tomorrow after the results come in ,but judging by all the neuron or should i say neurotic activity going on in their tonight as I wait nervously I feel you could definatly be wrong.

I HOPE


Michael


your grand eloquence bequeaths you :)

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Offline neilep

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #8 on: 23/06/2006 12:38:58 »
The premise behind my original post was that the term ' wind ' was a misnomer regarding the nature of what I thoguht was the vacuum of space.

In that 'wind ' is like a gust of air that you feel on your face...

.. Open Space...being atmospherically unfriendly, I thought the term ' wind ' was inappropriate....however, as George has enlightened me otherwise...even in the depths of space a vacuum is nigh on impossible.....so what about shock waves then ?...I presume the same applies  eh ?.....but on a lesser scale...In other words...where one would get destroyed by a shockwave here on earth...

...would one be able to survive the same in deep space ?

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Offline tony6789

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #9 on: 23/06/2006 15:46:35 »
well black holes r also the attention of an incorrect term. it is said that black holes are just a big vaccum sucking star into it. no this is not the case. black holes have an enormous amount of gravitational force so enormous that light cannot pass through it. so the term " the vaccume of space" is inccorect

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ROBERT

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #10 on: 23/06/2006 15:51:20 »
quote:
Originally posted by neilep

How can there be a Solar Wind in the vacuum of space ?

...does the same apply to shock-waves too ?



There is a phenomenon called a coronal mass ejection,
which is certainly a wind, (which can affect life on earth):-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronal_mass_ejection
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2000/ast13sep_1.htm
« Last Edit: 23/06/2006 15:52:52 by ROBERT »
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #11 on: 23/06/2006 16:15:55 »
Tahnks Robert.

Every definition of WIND that I have found describes it as moving air !

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another_someone

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #12 on: 23/06/2006 17:41:23 »
quote:
Originally posted by neilep

The premise behind my original post was that the term ' wind ' was a misnomer regarding the nature of what I thoguht was the vacuum of space.

In that 'wind ' is like a gust of air that you feel on your face...

.. Open Space...being atmospherically unfriendly, I thought the term ' wind ' was inappropriate....however, as George has enlightened me otherwise...even in the depths of space a vacuum is nigh on impossible.....so what about shock waves then ?...I presume the same applies  eh ?.....but on a lesser scale...In other words...where one would get destroyed by a shockwave here on earth...

...would one be able to survive the same in deep space ?



A shock wave is technically a supersonic wave front (i.e. the wave is moving so fast that the gas in front has no time to react to the incoming wave).

The material in the solar wind near the Earth is already moving at supersonic speeds.  Ofcourse, there are instances when even faster gusts of wind occur due to explosions on the surface of the Sun.  How much we are effected depends on how powerful the explosion is, and how much energy is imparted into the gust.  As you say, the density of gas is small, but the speed of the gas can be very high.  These high energy gusts can sometimes be powerful enough to effect communication satellites, etc.



George
 

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Re: Is Solar ' Wind ' a misnomer ?
« Reply #12 on: 23/06/2006 17:41:23 »

 

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