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Author Topic: Can rocks get worms?  (Read 2829 times)

Offline CliffordK

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Can rocks get worms?
« on: 09/01/2013 22:31:37 »
Can rocks get a case of worms?



« Last Edit: 10/01/2013 01:29:42 by CliffordK »


 

Offline RD

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #1 on: 10/01/2013 02:26:30 »
Maybe "tubular stalactites" in a previous life.

Quote
A helictite is a speleothem found in limestone caves ... They are usually made of needle-form calcite and aragonite. Forms of helictites have been described in several types: ribbon helictites, saws, rods, butterflies, "hands", curly-fries, and "clumps of worms."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helictite

"Soda Straws" (tubular stalactites) and Helictites ...

http://www.sterling-adventures.co.uk/blog/2012/01/23/were-going-on-a-helictite-hunt/
« Last Edit: 10/01/2013 03:10:41 by RD »
 

Offline OokieWonderslug

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #2 on: 10/01/2013 02:29:00 »
Sure that is not some really old hamburger?
 

Offline Don_1

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #3 on: 10/01/2013 11:46:26 »
This picture of a piece of a Martian meteorite caused quite a stir when it was found in 1984.



"Its a worm, a Martian worm!" was the cry of many. But it was later identified as being an inorganic structure.

Ah well, so much for the Martian Worm.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #4 on: 10/01/2013 23:25:43 »
I was wondering what would happen if one of the early Martian probes had found a rock like mine, with only the ability to take photos of it, and no ability for further analysis.  Would NASA have built a billion dollar rocket just to retrieve the one rock?

The Martian worm rock, of course, is microscopic.  The first photo above is close to real size.

I'm not sure I would call these Helictites, but they could have been formed by a similar mineral deposit growth process.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #5 on: 11/01/2013 06:34:54 »
I'm not sure I would call these Helictites, but they could have been formed by a similar mineral deposit growth process.

If it is speleothem it should bubble/dissolve in acid.
[ if you're going to try that do be careful with acid, e.g. wear safety glasses ]
« Last Edit: 11/01/2013 06:40:18 by RD »
 

Offline Lab Rat

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #6 on: 11/01/2013 14:23:48 »
Do you know what the matrix is that the worm-like structures are in.  I ask this because, due to the color and the amorphous qualities of some of the matrix, perhaps it is a rock, etc. covered in amber?  This could explain why some parts of the rock appear to have been living at one time.  Some of the most notable parts that could be amber I have circled in red.  Please note the similarities between the circled parts and the pictures I have posted.  Any ideas?

2nd picture from: http://www.diamonds1000.com/1017/
3rd picture from: http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread354128/pg1
Sorry that the first picture is so small- the file was too large at first.  You may need to use the original for reference.
« Last Edit: 11/01/2013 14:44:23 by Lab Rat »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #7 on: 11/01/2013 15:46:03 »
We had always called them agates.  Colors are usually translucent yellows and opaque whites.
They are often associated with petrified wood including one that my mother has that is a beautiful cast of petrified wood (I don't have a photo of that one now).

Anyway, I have wondered if it could be Amber instead.  I probably won't burn the above specimen, but I may hunt down a smaller piece and try a flame test.
 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
« Reply #8 on: 18/01/2013 21:09:26 »
I have a specimen of chalcedony that looks exactly like wax that has run down the side of a candle.  If this specimen is rotated through 90 deg. there would be a similarity.
 

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Re: Can rocks get worms?
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