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Author Topic: Ideas for measuring oxidation of a liquid?  (Read 6202 times)

Offline danjf

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Ideas for measuring oxidation of a liquid?
« on: 27/06/2006 21:55:04 »
Hi

I'm conducting an experiment to compare the oxidation of liquids in a bottle. (Think wine). Is there a chemical that will change color when exposed to air over time - so I can visually compare, for example, relative degrees of oxidation in bottles that contain different levels of liquid - such as almost empty bottles v. almost full? Or any other ideas on how to measure or compare oxidation. I'm hoping for something simple.

Thanks

Dan



 

Offline daveshorts

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Re: Ideas for measuring oxidation of a liquid?
« Reply #1 on: 01/07/2006 23:27:37 »
I am not a chemist, but there are lots of salts that will change colour in the presence of oxygen for example an iron (II) salt eg FeSO4 will oxidise to iron (III) Fe2(SO4)3 (rust) in the presence of oxygen, the rust is insoluble so should precipitate out, iron (II) salts are coloured, so it would get paler with oxidation. I am not sure how long it would take, or whether you would have to use so dilute solutions to see a difference it would never work.

on a quick web search there appear to be fish tank water oxygenation tests, I don't know if you could use or abuse one of these.

Something to think about if you are doing an experiment with solutions - there will be a load of oxygen disolved in the water to start with. You could get rid of it by boiling the water (this drives off dissolved gasses) before you put it in the bottle, although if you are looking at how the air above it affects it you may end up with the bottle being full of steam.

If you want to go really simple, you could just put some apple in there and see how long it takes to go brown.
 

Offline daveshorts

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Re: Ideas for measuring oxidation of a liquid?
« Reply #2 on: 01/07/2006 23:27:37 »
I am not a chemist, but there are lots of salts that will change colour in the presence of oxygen for example an iron (II) salt eg FeSO4 will oxidise to iron (III) Fe2(SO4)3 (rust) in the presence of oxygen, the rust is insoluble so should precipitate out, iron (II) salts are coloured, so it would get paler with oxidation. I am not sure how long it would take, or whether you would have to use so dilute solutions to see a difference it would never work.

on a quick web search there appear to be fish tank water oxygenation tests, I don't know if you could use or abuse one of these.

Something to think about if you are doing an experiment with solutions - there will be a load of oxygen disolved in the water to start with. You could get rid of it by boiling the water (this drives off dissolved gasses) before you put it in the bottle, although if you are looking at how the air above it affects it you may end up with the bottle being full of steam.

If you want to go really simple, you could just put some apple in there and see how long it takes to go brown.
 

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Re: Ideas for measuring oxidation of a liquid?
« Reply #2 on: 01/07/2006 23:27:37 »

 

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