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Offline clueless

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water leak
« on: 21/01/2013 21:26:20 »
There is a concrete room, which is narrow and 7 m high. The room is immersed in water. The water started to come in through a small hole in a wall. The hole is in the shape of a square, with its upper end 1 m above the floor. The leak can't be stopped. My question is will most of the room be filled with water? If not, how much of the room will be filled with water, approximately? Thanks.  xx(  :-[  :I


 

Offline syhprum

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Re: water leak
« Reply #1 on: 21/01/2013 21:31:48 »
What a meaningless question ! there is no data on which we could base any calculation and it has no relevance Physics and cosmology
 

Offline clueless

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Re: water leak
« Reply #2 on: 21/01/2013 21:59:48 »
Give me a break. Iím clueless.  :o
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: water leak
« Reply #3 on: 21/01/2013 22:01:21 »
There are several other variables you would need.

Is the room airtight?
The level of the water outside of the room.  If it is immersed, what is the depth?  Initial pressure inside?

If you drop your box to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, assuming it isn't crushed, water will initially rush in, giving you a rather small air bubble at equal pressure to the outside pressure, and over time, the air will be dissolved in the water, and the air bubble will disappear.

In your neighbor's swimming pool, assuming a closed container, you will have problems with air going out, and water coming in, but it will fill the box up to the level of the top of the square hole (1M).  I'm trying to think whether, at low pressures, the water would rise much above the hole.  Pressures should equalize as it is filling, so it should stop essentially at the top of the hole.

Directionality of the hole may be important too.  It would likely fill best if the hole slopes down from the outside to the inside of the box.

It may cut off all flow if the hole slopes up (significantly) from the outside to the inside, leaving only a little water on the floor.

If you have an air leak, it will fill to the level of the air leak, or the water level outside.
« Last Edit: 21/01/2013 22:04:09 by CliffordK »
 

Offline clueless

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Re: water leak
« Reply #4 on: 21/01/2013 22:49:01 »
In a riddle I'm working on, there is a man inside above room and there is air for him to breath.  The water should rise about 2.5 m inside the room. I guess I will modify the riddle and simply say that the room is immersed 2.5 m in the water.  :-[
« Last Edit: 22/01/2013 00:22:07 by clueless »
 

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Re: water leak
« Reply #4 on: 21/01/2013 22:49:01 »

 

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