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Author Topic: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?  (Read 4548 times)

Offline Voxx

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1: If someone was able to come up with a quantum binary system with turning electrons on and off, couldn't we use them to bypass latency all together.

2: If you were able to do that, than wouldn't the bottleneck be how fast the processors could recognize and translate the consistent switching off and on of the electrons?

3: If we used these in a large scale to simulate specific tasks in a computer it would only depend on processing power and isn't there some kind of quantum storage system or maybe quantum processing that would make every single action instantaneous?

4: Could you use quantum entanglement as a source of energy transference?  Charge one side and it charges the other?  Mass power distribution, where specific functioning paired electrons were only used for powering our devices (no more plugging into outlets or charging batteries).

5: Just like any other computer, if you had software able to translate the binary system set in place, then you could get video, audio, and any other feat a normal computer can accomplish, but instantaneously without the problems of reception, latency, or degradation of signal.

ps: this is all for my SF book and I just wanted to know if I had my theory correct.  Could you use anti-matter as the power source to charge these specific energy distributing electrons for clean energy?
« Last Edit: 21/04/2013 11:00:39 by chris »


 

Offline Voxx

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #1 on: 11/04/2013 04:58:54 »
No one wants to comment on my claim.  O.o  Have I really achieved that bad of a rep for the ridiculous SF?  T_T  (Just being a little melodramatic)
 

Offline kreskin123

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #2 on: 11/04/2013 05:49:36 »
Not to disuade you from continuing your book, but here's my take on the quantum computer.

"If someone was able to come up with a quantum binary system with turning electrons on and off", I'm pretty sure it would break the entanglement assumed by the rest of your ideas. Not sure, but that's my gut.  I guess you could get around this, just by saying they had found a way to preserve entanglement.  A plot point could be that you have to buy electron banks from transmission sources in order to receive their signals.

If somehow this did work as a means of FTL communication, I still don't like the term 'quantum computer' for anything like what we call a computer.  The only thing I would expect a quantum processor to be good at is generating random numbers really quickly.  Maybe you could use it to generate quantum variance in a holodeck program?

The power thing makes some sense, but we generally think of power as the flow of electrons, not their change in spin.  You might want to try to explain how they had been able to extract energy from the change in spin.
« Last Edit: 11/04/2013 05:56:48 by kreskin123 »
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #3 on: 11/04/2013 16:12:52 »
Thank you for responding.

In my thoughts, once a pair of elections are entangled.  No matter how far away they are, they imitate each other depending on the activity.

A computer turn processes data through 0's and 1's or off and on.  The same system can be given to these electrons to send data, just like a computer does.  The software would have to be fairly advanced to process the information and direct, but it isn't impossible.  Therefore you have a full functioning computer that can not only instantaneously transmit data in real time to any place in the "known" universe, but also mass complex numbers being processed at mind bending speeds.

I do have to think about your battery question.  I didn't think about how to extract the energy and i'll have to think deeper on that topic.

Thanks and tell me if I got anything wrong.
 

Offline bizerl

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #4 on: 11/04/2013 23:52:07 »
I'm sorry Voxx, I'm no scientist, but I always thought the issue with quantum entaglement is that you can't manipulate it, you can only measure it.

If I measure a single entangled electron I can find it has certain properties, but I can't control what those properties are, and therefore cannot control what the state of it's pair is.

Happy to be corrected by someone who knows more though!
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #5 on: 15/04/2013 17:11:54 »
Can we reverse the polarization of it?  Couldn't that act as a 0 or 1?  Or even manipulate the spin?
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #6 on: 18/04/2013 00:15:28 »
Can we reverse the polarization of it?  Couldn't that act as a 0 or 1?  Or even manipulate the spin?
You can, but if you mess with it, you break the entanglement. I believe the principle is that information can't be transferred via entanglement.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #7 on: 18/04/2013 19:48:18 »
Could I accomplish the computing system with quantum information theory/quantum teleportation.  It wouldn't instantaneous, but it wouldn't be subject to loss in information?  Isn't that right?
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #8 on: 18/04/2013 23:49:29 »
Could I accomplish the computing system with quantum information theory/quantum teleportation.  It wouldn't instantaneous, but it wouldn't be subject to loss in information?  Isn't that right?

There is such a thing as quantum computing, which uses information 'bits' that can have multiple superposed states (e.g. each can effectively be both 1 and 0 for binary 'qubits' or 1, 0, and -1 for trinary 'qutrits'); for example, photons in a superposition of horizontal and vertical polarisation can be used as qubits. Multiple qudits (the generic term) can be quantum-entangled to form a qudit register. These registers can be used for parallel quantum computations, the details of which are beyond my understanding...

Whether that corresponds to what you had in mind above, I don't know, but quantum computing has the potential to perform certain kinds of computations orders of magnitude faster than conventional computers.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #9 on: 19/04/2013 02:25:48 »
Alright, so then we already have the system in place, but can we use those pares as a means of communication?  If we can interpret and transmit these signals then do everything a normal computer can?  It would take a lot of setup, but it would be possible, yes?

I guess the only real bonus to this wouldn't have lost packets, (possibly) quicker than ordinary means, can be encrypted to incredible lengths, and one can tell if you are being monitored.

Did I mess anything up there or leave anything out?
 

Offline JP

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #10 on: 19/04/2013 03:15:55 »
Using entanglement to transmit information appears to be always limited to the speed of light--the same as with a classical information channel.  The gain from quantum computing is in very specific algorithms, such as cracking modern encryption.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: Questions on Quantum Computing
« Reply #11 on: 20/04/2013 04:16:16 »
We have quantum computing, but what benefits would we gain from quantum networking?

Encryption
Knowledge of being monitored
Not losing any packet information (anywhere)?
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #12 on: 21/04/2013 11:38:51 »
Encryption? You can use encryption on a normal network.
Knowledge of being monitored? Yes, entangled communication does allow you to tell if your channel is being interfered with. Any attempt to intercept will break the entanglement.
Not losing any packet information (anywhere)? Not really. Entangled communication is much more fragile than normal communication because the entanglement is easily broken (decohered). However all practical communications channels will have redundancy in their protocols so missing data can be recovered.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #13 on: 22/04/2013 00:07:16 »
Encryption? You can use encryption on a normal network.
Knowledge of being monitored? Yes, entangled communication does allow you to tell if your channel is being interfered with. Any attempt to intercept will break the entanglement.
Not losing any packet information (anywhere)? Not really. Entangled communication is much more fragile than normal communication because the entanglement is easily broken (decohered). However all practical communications channels will have redundancy in their protocols so missing data can be recovered.

Are you saying there are no advantages to a quantum network?  Is there anything that you can see that a quantum network could do that our ordinary one cannot?
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #14 on: 22/04/2013 11:27:01 »
Are you saying there are no advantages to a quantum network?
No, I'm responding to your list of questions. Being aware of communication interception is a major advantage for quantum entangled communications channels.

Quote
Is there anything that you can see that a quantum network could do that our ordinary one cannot?
Other than the security aspect? I can't think of anything off-hand. But you haven't defined what you mean by a 'quantum network'. I'm assuming you mean a standard network topology where the cables are replaced by comms links involving quantum entanglement.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #15 on: 23/04/2013 04:41:42 »
I'm referring to 'Quantum Network' in the classical sense of our computing.  Changing out every computer in the world for a quantum functioning interactive network.  I know we are possibly far from being able to achieve such a feat, but I'm wondering what it could do.
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #16 on: 23/04/2013 19:27:59 »
I'm referring to 'Quantum Network' in the classical sense of our computing.
Nope, I still don't follow. Quantum computing is generally contrasted with classical computing; it is non-classical by definition...

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Changing out every computer in the world for a quantum functioning interactive network.
But what is a 'quantum functioning interactive network' ? (e.g. how does it work, what does it do?)

And if you replace every computer with a network, what's going to do the computation?
 

Offline FunkyWorm

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #17 on: 23/05/2013 10:45:09 »
The thing that has always annoyed me with the popular reporting of quantum computing is that every article I've read on the subject since the late '70s always finishes up with something like
Quote
..since each qubit can simultaneously hold both binary values every solution becomes available immediately
(or something like that). That seems to have just transformed the problem from one of time (to calculation) to one of searching a huge data set for the required result.
Has any writer of Scientific American, Wired, BBC Horizon etc actually understood the nature of Quantum Computing - as a broadcast electronics engineer I know I don't!
 

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Re: How can we realise the goals of quantum computing?
« Reply #17 on: 23/05/2013 10:45:09 »

 

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