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Author Topic: Is Homo the only genus with one representative living species?  (Read 3856 times)

Offline bobfl42

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The genus "Homo" only has one species, "Homo sapiens". What other genus also has only one representative species, as all other species have died out? Does this mean that from an evolutionary standpoint our species is not very successful and will inevitably die out in the not too far distant future.

Robert…
« Last Edit: 14/04/2013 10:40:28 by chris »


 

Offline Don_1

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Yes there are other genus with a single species, the Gingko is the only extant species of the genus, erm..... Gingko. Since this 'living fossil' has been around for at least 270m years, it doesn't really prophecy the iminant demise of Homo Sapien.

The Tarsius is a genus of small primate of a single species, though there are sub-species.
 

Offline CliffordK

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The Duck Billed Platypus is also the only living representative of its species.
Also the Tasmanian Devil (which may be endangered due to a form of transmissible cancer).
The Narwhal, or Sea Unicorn is, of course its own Genus.

I wonder if there are a great many animals that are as distinct as the separation between humans and chimpanzees.  For example the Amazonian Manatee may be completely isolated from Sea Manatees. 
River Dolphins also seem to have achieved a large amount of isolation, so depending on the river system, there are some that are considered one species per genus.
 

Offline cheryl j

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The duck billed platypus, tazmanian devil and (especially) the Narwhal all seem like animals somebody totally made up.
 

Offline CliffordK

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I'd give it a 50/50 chance that in 20 years there may only be one subspecies of white rhino.  Is that too optimistic?
 

Offline Don_1

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I'd give it a 50/50 chance that in 20 years there may only be one subspecies of white rhino.  Is that too optimistic?

I hope you are wrong, Clifford, but sadly I think you may indeed be overoptomistic.

The greatly endangered Hyacinth Macaw is of the genus Anodorhynchus. The only other species extant in this genus is the much rarer Lear's (or Indigo) Macaw. Both are protected by appendix 1 of CITES. The Scarlet Macaw is of the genus Ara, a genus of 8 extant species.
 

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