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Author Topic: Is it possible to bend some space-time?  (Read 15792 times)

Offline yor_on

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Re: Is it possible to bend some space-time?
« Reply #75 on: 21/04/2013 18:28:30 »
And it is still becoming hand waving to me, I'm afraid. Excellent hand waving, based on mathematics, but not describing my universe. And so theoretical, if it in any way is a analogue to a hologram, then we should be able to see it experimentally. testing small scales.
=

And if you did read the link, you can compare it to this statement.

"The maximization of entropy postulated by the second law of thermodynamics, perhaps the most general law of physics, remains one of the most puzzling issues in contemporary science. There have been at least twenty other different and often mutually exclusive definitions of entropy.

Thermodynamic entropy (Gibbs) always increases; statistical entropy Boltzmann) tends to increase, while informational entropy (Shannon) decreases with the arrival of a message. In Shannon's equation, entropy and information are positively related, but many authors consider information as negative entropy.

This terminological confusion reflects deep conceptual discrepancies. Contemporary science includes three contradictory models: (1) Mechanics (Newtonian, relativistic, quantic or statistical), postulating static structures and reversible change; time reversibility implies a cosmic symmetry and the conservation of information. (2) Evolutionary theories that postulate a temporal increase in complexity and diversity. (3) Thermodynamics, postulating involution toward resting equilibrium (Clausius) and disorder (Boltzmann).

Statistical Mechanics provides a scenario in which mechanism and thermodynamics can coexist by explaining entropy as a probabilistic phenomenon; however, it allows for reversibility (excluded by the second law), it fails to explain why either evolution or irreversibility occur, and it must explain the tendency to maximize entropy as the result of initial conditions, which are both arbitrary and untestable.

Two solutions have been offered to the contradiction between evolution and thermodynamics: (a) the expansion of space, both physical, and genetic; and (b) the hypothesis that entropy increases necessarily only in closed systems, whereas open systems such as biological organisms and other complex processes may reduce their internal entropy by importing free energy from the environment, and exporting entropy to it."

From "Entropy as symmetry: theory and empirical support".  By Sabelli, H. (1994)
« Last Edit: 21/04/2013 18:50:27 by yor_on »
 

Offline faytmorgan

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Re: Is it possible to bend some space-time?
« Reply #76 on: 22/04/2013 14:55:14 »
what exactly is your point
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Is it possible to bend some space-time?
« Reply #77 on: 23/04/2013 15:59:57 »
Well, it's about possible interpretations, and what they will do to ones formulation, and theory, relative experiments. I'm old fashioned :) I like experiments proving a point.
 

Offline Ethos_

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Re: Is it possible to bend some space-time?
« Reply #78 on: 23/04/2013 17:06:13 »
Well, it's about possible interpretations, and what they will do to ones formulation, and theory, relative experiments. I'm old fashioned :) I like experiments proving a point.
Absolutely yor_on, it's called the scientific method..............
 

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Re: Is it possible to bend some space-time?
« Reply #78 on: 23/04/2013 17:06:13 »

 

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