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Author Topic: Has anyone tried performing optical holography using a CCD chip as the film?  (Read 1095 times)

Offline AndroidNeox

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Has anyone tried performing optical holography using a CCD chip as the film?

What sort of granularity is necessary for optical holography?

Maybe, even if some of the smaller features were lost, there would be enough info in the larger features of the interference pattern would allow for some extraction of 3-dimensional information?


 

Offline JP

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Very good question!  Yes, this is done and it's in fact a large area of current research.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_holography 

Instead of recording a hologram and then "playing it back" by shining a light through it, digital holography generally records a hologram on a digital camera, stores it digitally in a computer, then various tricks can be used to reconstruct a 3D scene from the object.  The basic trick is to computationally simulate the effect of shining a light through it.  One could also print out a physical version of the stored hologram and do more traditional playback with it.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Has anyone tried performing optical holography using a CCD chip as the film?

What sort of granularity is necessary for optical holography?

Maybe, even if some of the smaller features were lost, there would be enough info in the larger features of the interference pattern would allow for some extraction of 3-dimensional information?

I did some holography a while ago. The film I used had a resolution of something like 5000 lines per mm and was about 35 mm by 50.
That's about 45 gigapixels so modern digital cameras are not getting there (yet).
You might get some sort of image, but it wouldn't be very impressive.
Digitally generated holograms are a better bet.
 

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