The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: What should be taken into account when flying helium balloons?  (Read 1161 times)

Offline idanraizberg

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Hi,
I am an Industrial design student and I am participating in a project that involves flying helium inflated balloons to a height of up to 50 meters, in order to gather people and attract crowds.
I have a few aerodynamics related questions and i'll be happy if any of you guys can help:

1. What is the best shape for a balloon, that can reach up to a height of 50 meters, and will be able to stay up in strong winds in an urban environment? (around 3-5 cubic meters)
2. Should the body have certain of fins in order to stabilize it? What should the material (if so needed) of the fin be made of?
3. What would be your recommendation for the material used to make the balloon?
4. The balloon would be anchored to the ground, with a cable, and will need to carry a weight of about 3-4 kilos.

thanks,
Idan

Mod: Please don't repeat the same post in multiple subforums.
« Last Edit: 13/05/2013 16:32:46 by chris »


 

Offline David Cooper

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1505
    • View Profile
Re: flying helium inflated balloons
« Reply #1 on: 12/05/2013 16:38:47 »
You should think seriously about insurance too if you're going to fly heavy weights over people's heads.
 

Online yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12001
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Re: flying helium inflated balloons
« Reply #2 on: 12/05/2013 17:27:11 »
http://www.ecvery.com/showroom/advertising-balloon.html

And a blimp would be nice, to turn into the wind, but it depends, maybe you want it to rotate?
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: flying helium inflated balloons
« Reply #3 on: 12/05/2013 18:08:06 »
A sphere maximizes surface area to volume.  Thus, more lift.  However, hot air balloons have been made in many shapes and sizes depending on the purpose. 

A tether, perhaps a multi-point tether would stabilize it, but as others have mentioned, a blimp is a good shape that works well in the wind.
 

Offline evan_au

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4128
  • Thanked: 247 times
    • View Profile
Re: flying helium inflated balloons
« Reply #4 on: 13/05/2013 11:43:56 »
Helium is a pretty slippery substance, so the skin of the balloon must be very impermeable, with very well-sealed seams.

This also helps reduce running costs, since Helium prices are set to increase next year...

It may pay to invest in a pump that can compress the helium back into a cylinder for transport, rather than just venting it into the atmosphere?
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: flying helium inflated balloons
« Reply #4 on: 13/05/2013 11:43:56 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums