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Author Topic: why do dogs circle around in their bed before they lie down?  (Read 2695 times)

Offline The Acid King

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Is it evolutionary or hereditary or something else?


 

Offline John Burnap

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I believe they are making their bed before they get into it. Which is pretty much what I do.

There are a number of animals that will mat down the grass or whatever to make a little bed for themselves. My question is, how does that trampling give them an advantage for survival?
 

Offline Don_1

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There can be no definative answer to this question, but the suggestion that it may be to signal that "I, a dog, was here" can be disscounted. Urine is a much more potent signal of that fact. The habit will undoubtedly date back to long before dogs and humans came together.

Trampling the growth in one direction may make the 'bed' a little more comfortable and moving on any insects may also make the bed less liable to bite or sting.

I don't think there is any suggestion that this habit gave dogs any survival advantage.
 

Offline RD

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... My question is, how does that trampling give them an advantage for survival?

The trampled grass could function as a mattress providing insulation from the cold ground.

Trampling could reduce the odds of them lying down on venomous creatures : snakes , scorpions,
or biting insects which transmit disease or create debilitating wounds.
« Last Edit: 24/06/2013 17:45:28 by RD »
 

Offline Don_1

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and moving on any insects may also make the bed less liable to bite or sting.

I don't think there is any suggestion that this habit gave dogs any survival advantage.



... My question is, how does that trampling give them an advantage for survival?

The trampled grass could function as a mattress providing insulation from the cold ground.

Trampling could reduce the odds of them lying down on venomous creatures : snakes , scorpions,
or biting insects which transmit disease or create debilitating wounds.

I suppose you could call that a survival advantage.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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"I don't think there is any suggestion that this habit gave dogs any survival advantage."
Yes there is. The fact that they do it suggests it has a survival advantage.
 

lean bean

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The trampled grass could function as a mattress providing insulation from the cold ground.

Trampling could reduce the odds of them lying down on venomous creatures : snakes , scorpions,
or biting insects which transmit disease or create debilitating wounds.
And unseen bumpy rocks in the grass.
Another thing... perhaps long grass, if not trampled down, tickles or pushes the fur up and so would allow cold air to reach the skin.
 

Offline nicephotog

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Trampling the growth in one direction may make the 'bed' a little more comfortable and moving on any insects may also make the bed less liable to bite or sting.

I tend to agree with this, but it is one point to do that to be comfortable, its another entirely to commit that for security reasons but for how nasty "plonking" down on a sharp rock would be, i have done that with great pain many times in the outdoors, so it makes much sense to test the "the comfy chair level" of the plonk.
 

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