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Author Topic: What is the definition of a geometric object?  (Read 2931 times)

Offline Pmb

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What is the definition of a geometric object?
« on: 03/07/2013 00:16:55 »
Do you all know the relationship between coordinate systems and geometric objects? What I'm curious about is how well the notion of geometric object is understood by the physics enthusiasts. What do tyou think the definition of geometric object is? I got into a discussion somewhere on this. It turns out that nobody understood it. I was shocked.

Thanks for satisfying my curiosity on this point.
« Last Edit: 04/07/2013 22:47:17 by chris »


 

Offline Bill S

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Re: Coordinate systems and bases
« Reply #1 on: 03/07/2013 03:37:12 »
Quote
What do you think the definition of geometric object is?

My (very limited) understanding is that geometric objects are points, lines, curves, conic sections etc; as distinct from geometric shapes, which are squares, triangles, circles etc.

I bet you were looking for something more esoteric.
 

Offline Pmb

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Re: Coordinate systems and bases
« Reply #2 on: 03/07/2013 03:54:29 »
Quote
What do you think the definition of geometric object is?

My (very limited) understanding is that geometric objects are points, lines, curves, conic sections etc; as distinct from geometric shapes, which are squares, triangles, circles etc.

I bet you were looking for something more esoteric.
I'll answer that later. Right now I'm trying to get a feel for what people think of when they hear that term. I was unfamiliar with what people think it means. I only know how the term is defined in differential geometry.
 

Offline Pmb

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Re: Coordinate systems and bases
« Reply #3 on: 03/07/2013 19:45:13 »
Quote from: lean bean
I thought of a manifold being defined by points/events, on that manifold each observer creates their own coordinate system/frame of reference as dictated by their observations as they move about that manifold.
In other words, their experience of the manifold points/events may not be the same as other observers.
Energy/mass alter that manifold so that it, the manifold, is not the same everywhere.
I agree with everything you say here.
Quote from: lean bean
This maybe gobbledygook and completely off topic... so I won't go on.
Well, you did ask. No laughing there.
Not gobbledygook but not related to the subject. Thanks for posting though. I always appreciate what you have to say LB! :)
 

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Re: Coordinate systems and bases
« Reply #3 on: 03/07/2013 19:45:13 »

 

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