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Author Topic: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?  (Read 7120 times)

Offline CliffordK

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #25 on: 21/08/2013 06:21:06 »
Diamond is a poor conductor, so it may not attract a lightening strike.  One might add a copper cap & grounding system to further protect it.

Graphite/Carbon Fiber/Carbon nanotubes are all relatively good conductors, so they would attract lightening anywhere.  Being a relatively good conductor, the resistance would be low, and thus they may not overheat with the lightening, whereas the poorer conductors (dimaond) may overheat with a lightening strike.

Still, it is unclear, but the diamond may not be able to sustain fire at 20% oxygen.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #26 on: 21/08/2013 19:01:32 »
Do you realise that a burning diamond releases more energy weight for weight than burning coal?
If a coal fire can sustain itself...
Also, diamonds are brittle.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #27 on: 24/08/2013 08:13:37 »
Alright.  Tell me what you think of this as a solid wall.  I still don't know its exact thickness and you all may laugh at me for the creation, pointing out flaws, but I'll lay it out there.

All of the walls have a micro carbon linked core that acts as the support and itís made in a honeycomb shape to add structural consistency.  Then a layer of tempered steel enforced concrete covers that and finally over that is a thick coat of tantalum hafnium carbide.
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #28 on: 24/08/2013 09:03:04 »
But what prevents anyone from climbing or flying over it? Mount Everest at nearly 9000 meters is climbed several times a year and overflown several times a day. It's made of perfectly ordinary rock and has been there for millions of years. Why try to invent something exotic and ineffective?

I've no idea what TaHfC might add to your project, but rancid mutton fat or commerical anticlimb paint would be useful.

The proven effective method of physical containment is an electrified barbed wire fence that delays people long enough for you to shoot them. If you are worried about exsurgents ramming the fence with a vehicle, add a minefield, or tank traps and rockets.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #29 on: 24/08/2013 14:59:18 »
Perhaps one should watch some Indiana Jones movies to find some deterrents from doing undesired actions.

Carbide would make the wall difficult to cut.  Impact resistance?  Perhaps layered with a highly impact resistant mild steel, and extremely hard and difficult to cut carbide.  Grinding stones, of course, are good at cutting most metals.

It is also a good point that one wouldn't necessarily wish to make the value of the components of the wall such that scrappers would cut holes in it for the value.  Perhaps add certain signature isotopes that could be detected at the scrap yards.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #30 on: 24/08/2013 17:28:14 »
Alright, so should the carbide be on the inside and the reinforced concrete be on the outside?  Perhaps add a mild steel sheeting to the concrete?

As for climbing the wall, it's continually patrolled and anyone that climbs the wall is either incorporated into the watch (forceful methods) or killed.  What kind of detection hardware would be usable along a long distance to detect motion above a certain distance.  When I mean motion, I mean anything from bio-electrical activity, heat, motion, laser break detection or any other kind of means.

Anything you guys can think of?
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #31 on: 24/08/2013 19:55:29 »
I think steel clad concrete would be cheaper.
A coat of paint will stop it rusting.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #32 on: 24/08/2013 21:06:56 »
Maybe add an aerogel outer coat for the final product?
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #33 on: 24/08/2013 21:20:44 »
Just watched "Patton" on TV (I missed it in the cinema, 40 years ago!)

Whatever you may think of his personality, he was one hell of a warrior and a very astute historian. Here's his take on high walls:

"Fixed fortifications are a monument to the stupidity of man."
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #34 on: 25/08/2013 04:19:15 »
Maybe add an aerogel outer coat for the final product?
Aerogel? 

Why?

It is light.  Excellent insulator.  And has been used t absorb particles of stuff.  Dust, Sand, ???  I suppose it would resist burning.

However, I think it is very hygroscopic, and I don't believe it is very strong or durable.  i doubt it would stand up to the elements.

BC suggests steel on the outside, [Reinforced] concrete on the inside. 

Natural stone such as Granite Block is also quite resistant to a number of factors.  Make a lattice of 100 ton blocks, and it would take quite a bit to move them.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #35 on: 25/08/2013 10:33:54 »
Maybe add an aerogel outer coat for the final product?
I understand that aerogels have physical characteristics that are roughly comparable with meringue.
The significant differences would be that aerogels have a lower density, but dried egg white is cheaper.

The deciding factor may be how much of it gets eaten by rats.
 

Offline Voxx

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #36 on: 07/10/2013 21:33:49 »
I know this is an old topic, but what about this as what I've decided.  (Tear my construct apart the best you can :])

All of the walls have a micro carbon linked core that acts as the support and itís made in a honeycomb shape to add structural consistency.  Then a layer of tempered steel enforced concrete covers that and finally over that is a thick coat of tantalum hafnium carbide.

Thoughts?
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #37 on: 08/10/2013 19:21:33 »
The carbide and concrete are brittle. Given time you could get through them with a jack hammer.
This sort of quest is impossible.
For any combination you suggest, I can think of a way through.
 

Offline dlorde

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #38 on: 08/10/2013 20:18:40 »
For any combination you suggest, I can think of a way through.
Or around, or over, or under...
 

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Re: How can a 350 meter wall support itself?
« Reply #38 on: 08/10/2013 20:18:40 »

 

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