The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: All things photosensitive!  (Read 2995 times)

Offline distressedprincess

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
All things photosensitive!
« on: 22/08/2013 08:25:38 »
Hi there naked scientists! I have a question regarding photo sensitive chemicals, as they are too expensive to buy myself, I thought I woukd ask. I am making a new art instalation and am looking at doing a painting that appears slowly within 24 hours. From my understanding I can do this with photo developer (although 24 hours latet in ligh its oily, drips, and still not browning). I decided to look into it more. Sulver nitrate, will turn black/brown with exposure, but after how long? Also, is it possibke for me to use different colours? Eg, other silver chemicals that, lets say, might turn purple? Thanks guys! Oh btw im no scientist, just an artist looking for fun things to play with, so please keep the scientist terms easy for me to understand haha


 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8134
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
Re: All things photosensitive!
« Reply #1 on: 22/08/2013 09:38:43 »
there are cheaper alternatives to silver-halide ... http://www.alternativephotography.com/wp/processes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanotype

http://io9.com/5014070/is-stay+green-grass-the-artists-medium-of-the-future


If you made light-boxes lit by incandescent lamps so were warm* a painting could be made to slowly appear ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invisible_ink#Inks_developed_by_heat

[ * potential fire/burn hazard though ]
« Last Edit: 22/08/2013 10:04:03 by RD »
 

Offline chiralSPO

  • Global Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1880
  • Thanked: 145 times
    • View Profile
Re: All things photosensitive!
« Reply #2 on: 25/08/2013 01:37:10 »
Your paint could be air sensitive rather than photosensitive. There are chemicals that react with oxygen, water or CO2 in the atmosphere and turn colors (like how apples and potatoes brown in air). The trick is getting it onto your painting before it goes.

I don't know what will suit your needs, but off the top of my head I can think of copper sulfate, which typically exists as a bright blue hydrate. You can crush it and heat it in the oven to dehydrate it to a white powder, which will then slowly absorb water from the atmosphere and turn blue again. You might have luck trying to paint with that.

Also, there are some organic compounds like hydroquinones and analines that can turn from colorless to brilliant reds, purples and blues. I don't know how easy they would be to get, though.

Good luck!
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8676
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Re: All things photosensitive!
« Reply #3 on: 26/08/2013 19:49:15 »
If you are prepared to use reaction with air to get a colour change then this might help.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo_dye#Indigo_white
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Re: All things photosensitive!
« Reply #4 on: 26/08/2013 20:40:11 »
Did someone say "grass"?

Many organics will change over time. 

Perhaps you could make a paste out of grass clippings or something that would be expected to turn brown over a couple of days, then color-match a green paint that wouldn't turn brown for other parts of your painting.

Fading or Bleaching?  Perhaps over a few months?  Quicker? 

Sometimes people do body art using sun tan lotion over some areas of the body, and nothing over other ares of the body.  If you had something that faded quickly in sunlight, you could put a UV protectant over part of the painting.   

Of course, auto body shops dislike touching up panels because while they may get a perfect match at the time of application, over a few years, invariably different paints will age differently.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: All things photosensitive!
« Reply #4 on: 26/08/2013 20:40:11 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums