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Author Topic: Voyager 1 in interstellar space  (Read 2184 times)

lean bean

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Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« on: 13/09/2013 18:01:08 »
A few years back I was one of those who submitted my name ,via Nasa website, to be put on the 'Deep Impact' mission to impact with a comet. Just my name, not me in body of course

 Are there any sentimental jellybabies here, who would have liked to have thier name aboard the Voyager probe now in interstellar space. And why?
« Last Edit: 13/09/2013 18:02:40 by lean bean »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #1 on: 13/09/2013 23:29:20 »
I could imagine it could be a good fund raising program.  How long would microfiche last in a probe once open to space?  Or could one get it micro-engraved in gold?  Asbestos coat it in case of re-entry.

Personally I doubt that that Voyager will ever be discovered by Aliens, with only a very remote possibility that it would be picked up by future terrestrial archaeologists.  If a long defunct alien "probe" made a flyby past Jupiter, I doubt we would ever see it and probably never know its significance.  We might not even recognize it if it crashed into the Earth or Moon.

Thus, I might consider adding names and perhaps biographies of individuals with major contributions to building and launching the probes, or significant contemporary government figures.  However, I wouldn't invest in just signing my name to it.
 

Offline Don_1

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #2 on: 14/09/2013 16:37:41 »
Like Clifford, I don't think it will ever be found by anyone or anything, so I would not have bothered to put my name on it.

However, for those very reasons, my other half would have liked to have put ME on it!
 

lean bean

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #3 on: 14/09/2013 17:57:54 »
Found or not,at least you could say your name’s amongst the stars.  Although mine is now smashed away.
Didn't cost a penny, just a few taps on keyboard, it was free to submit name for 'Deep impact' mission.
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The mission was notable for one of its promotional activities, "Send Your Name To A Comet!". Visitors to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's website were invited to submit their name between May 2003 and January 2004, and the names gathered—some 625,000 in all—were then burnt onto a mini-CD, which was attached to the impactor. Dr. Don Yeomans, a member of the spacecraft's scientific team, stated "this is an opportunity to become part of an extraordinary space mission ... when the craft is launched in December 2004, yours and the names of your loved-ones can hitch along for the ride and be part of what may be the best space fireworks show in history."[48] The idea was credited with driving interest in the mission.
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Impact_(spacecraft

I did it knowing my name was not going to last long because of future impact.

Cliff
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If a long defunct alien "probe" made a flyby past Jupiter, I doubt we would ever see it and probably never know its significance.  We might not even recognize it if it crashed into the Earth or Moon.
Cliff , So you have no hope for our distant future descendants evolving better technology and their coverage or settlement of the solar system…Clarke's Third Law: Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
I can see you two are tough jellybabies.  :) :)
 

Offline Don_1

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #4 on: 14/09/2013 18:14:21 »

.....indistinguishable from magic.


Which is all slight of hand and mirrors.......
 

lean bean

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #5 on: 15/09/2013 10:07:45 »

.....indistinguishable from magic.

Which is all slight of hand and mirrors.......

Don't get that Don?  Future technology would be real.
 If it was possible to show a working tv to a stone age man, I suppose he would be a 'little' spooked, but he would be wrong to think the tv was a 'slight of hand trick'. Also he may be spooked by the real mirror and the ugly reflection! 
But, I think I may misunderstand you.

Another thing about having your name aboard Voyager...
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The Voyager-1 spacecraft has become the first manmade object to leave the Solar System.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24026153
You must be a very tough jellybaby if you don't want to be part of that.



 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #6 on: 15/09/2013 22:20:42 »
The question may be whether we will have any huge technological leaps, or if future technology will be improving and honing what we already have.

I'm not convinced that we'll ever have a starship even remotely resembling the Star Trek Enterprise, capable of having artificial gravity, and reaching truly unbelievable speeds instantaneously without any sensation of acceleration.

We have a lot of troubles seeing space junk left on the moon, and could easily miss it if we didn't know where to look.

Voyager has been invisible to telescopes essentially since it was launched despite improvements in telescope technology, and having active broadcasting which could be used to triangulate the position.  The Hubble has never been able to see it even in 1990 when theHubble was launched.  What about the "warm spot"?  Eventually it will go silent & cold, and if not broadcasting and generating its own heat, it would be extremely difficult to find.

My hope is that we will eventually colonize the moon, and then start installing enormous telescopes in some of the lunar craters. 

Perhaps with a 1 mile diameter telescope, we'll be able to once again find the Pioneer and Voyager probes.  How many pixels?  Enough to distinguish them from other Kuiper Belt objects?  Will we ever map everything in the Kuiper Belt down to 1 meter size, and have a good enough view of all the Kuiper Belt objects to distinguish rocks from artificial constructions?

Perhaps the future will bring better remote materials identification which might help identify stuff that isn't just ice and rock in space.

Anyway, I guess I don't need to sign my name to stuff that I haven't had a substantial contribution to its creation.
 

lean bean

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #7 on: 16/09/2013 19:53:09 »
The question may be whether we will have any huge technological leaps, or if future technology will be improving and honing what we already have.
Yes, that's what the stone age man said. He didn't even know about science.

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I'm not convinced that we'll ever have a starship even remotely resembling the Star Trek Enterprise, capable of having artificial gravity, and reaching truly unbelievable speeds instantaneously without any sensation of acceleration.
Yes, that sounds just like magic now doesn't it. But, that's what  Clarke's Third Law is about. 
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We have a lot of troubles seeing space junk left on the moon, and could easily miss it if we didn't know where to look.
Yes, today we do...Perhaps in the very distant future?

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Voyager has been invisible to telescopes essentially since it was launched despite improvements in telescope technology, and having active broadcasting which could be used to triangulate the position.
 The Hubble has never been able to see it even in 1990 when theHubble was launched.  What about the "warm spot"?  Eventually it will go silent & cold, and if not broadcasting and generating its own heat, it would be extremely difficult to find.
Who's talking of keeping track of 'recent' probes with todays technology?
 I was wondering about your point...
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If a long defunct alien "probe" made a flyby past Jupiter, I doubt we would ever see it and probably never know its significance.  We might not even recognize it if it crashed into the Earth or Moon.
And there's you talking of colonizing the moon in the near future, Whilst I'm talking of the very distant future with a technology coming  from a sceince we wouldn't understand today. 


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My hope is that we will eventually colonize the moon, and then start installing enormous telescopes in some of the lunar craters.
Try to convince the stone age man of that.


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Perhaps the future will bring better remote materials identification which might help identify stuff that isn't just ice and rock in space.
Do you mean better advanced technology. Clarke's Third Law.

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Anyway, I guess I don't need to sign my name to stuff that I haven't had a substantial contribution to its creation.
It was for fun. No deep meaning to it. Just like the 625,000 names on the Deep impactor probe. Cliff ,you really are a tough jellybaby. :)
« Last Edit: 16/09/2013 19:57:44 by lean bean »
 

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Re: Voyager 1 in interstellar space
« Reply #7 on: 16/09/2013 19:53:09 »

 

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