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Author Topic: Does the Schwarzschild radius mark a matter compression limit?  (Read 1305 times)

Offline jeffreyH

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Can matter really collapse to a singularity or is the Schwarzschild radius the delimiting factor. Would this resolve the singularity problem?


 

Offline syhprum

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I do not believe in singularities I think matter can be compressed sufficiently to hide behind an event horizon without collapsing to a quasi infinite density.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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It may well though light speed would be violated and you would still have similar problems to singularities. What if it required infinite entropic loss to cross the horizon?
 

Offline evan_au

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This sounds similar to the following argument: Because of Einstein's time dilation near the event horizon, an observer far from the black hole would never see anything actually cross the event horizon - it will hover just outside the event horizon, and be red-shifted into oblivion, but it will never actually seem to cross the event horizon.

From the viewpoint of an observer falling into a black hole, reaching and crossing the event horizon occurs in a quite short time (if you don't get spaghettified or turned into a plasma first).

This doesn't really solve the question of black hole formation for us as observers of distant supernovae, because the core collapse occurs inside an exploding star - the best we can hope for with our current technology is to see a burst of neutrinos, and to do some computer modelling of the complex processes leading up to the formation of the black hole.

This does not answer the question for the observer falling into a massive black hole - what they see beyond the event horizon remains a mystery - even if someone did make the one-way trip, we know of no way they could relay their experiences to someone outside the black hole.

The LHC may be able to answer some questions about black holes, if they are able to create some black holes with the mass of a nucleus - but these are expected to evaporate very quickly via Hawking radiation.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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This sounds similar to the following argument: Because of Einstein's time dilation near the event horizon, an observer far from the black hole would never see anything actually cross the event horizon - it will hover just outside the event horizon, and be red-shifted into oblivion, but it will never actually seem to cross the event horizon.


What if this is because there is no event horizon?
 

Offline Pmb

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This sounds similar to the following argument: Because of Einstein's time dilation near the event horizon, an observer far from the black hole would never see anything actually cross the event horizon - it will hover just outside the event horizon, and be red-shifted into oblivion, but it will never actually seem to cross the event horizon.


What if this is because there is no event horizon?
What kind of answer do you expect when you ask questions like this? You're basically asking "If Einstein's theory is wrong then how is the universe behaving to make it wrong?"

There are no answers of this kind in science. Science can only tell you the way things actually are observed. It cannot tell you what things are like when things are not as observed.
 

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