The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Have you read Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem?  (Read 2316 times)

Offline paros

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 24
    • View Profile
Have you read Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem?
« on: 13/09/2013 21:55:24 »
This is a book which covers the relationship between conservation laws and symmetries in physical laws of nature. The book goes into depth about the meanings of Hamiltonian Mechanics and the Euler-Lagrange equation.  The Principle of Least Action is a central theme running through the chapters of the book.   

Has anyone read this or have a copy around?

http://www.amazon.com/Noethers-Wonderful-Theorem-Dwight-Neuenschwander/dp/0801896940 [nofollow]

« Last Edit: 17/09/2013 23:18:53 by chris »


 

Offline Pmb

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1838
  • Physicist
    • View Profile
    • New England Science Constortium
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #1 on: 13/09/2013 22:42:06 »
This is a book which covers the relationship between conservation laws and symmetries in physical laws of nature. The book goes into depth about the meanings of Hamiltonian Mechanics and the Euler-Lagrange equation.  The Principle of Least Action is a central theme running through the chapters of the book.   

Has anyone read this or have a copy around?

http://www.amazon.com/Noethers-Wonderful-Theorem-Dwight-Neuenschwander/dp/0801896940


Yes. I have a copy and have been reading it. You're right. It's a great book.
 

Offline imatfaal

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2787
  • rouge moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #2 on: 15/09/2013 11:18:35 »
Peter Paros  might I ask what sort of level it is aimed at? Pop-Sci or math-heavy or more likely somewhere in between - but sounds like an interesting read.
 

Offline Pmb

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1838
  • Physicist
    • View Profile
    • New England Science Constortium
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #3 on: 15/09/2013 17:02:15 »
Peter Paros  might I ask what sort of level it is aimed at? Pop-Sci or math-heavy or more likely somewhere in between - but sounds like an interesting read.
It's on the math level of something like Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences by Mary L. Boas. Since I love Boas I also love this book. If you love this subject and the history of mathematical physics then you'd love this book too. The material is like that found in Lanczos's text Variational Principles of Mechanics.
 

Offline imatfaal

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2787
  • rouge moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #4 on: 16/09/2013 18:25:15 »
Thanks Pete.  I think it might be too technical for me - doing three online courses at present and not sure I have the time for a book that whilst it looks great would require a huge investment of time for an layman like me.
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11993
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #5 on: 16/09/2013 21:18:34 »
No matter if Emmy was right or wrong, it's a remarkable intellectual achievement, worthy of a position at the side of Einstein. We don't have any set truths, we have propositions that makes sense to us at the time we live. They change, and with them we do too.
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11993
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #6 on: 16/09/2013 22:01:07 »
Or put another way. In physics this will be true, practically we have dreams and ideas that seem timeless though, as 'love'. And it's worth asking yourself why you think you are here.
 

Offline Pmb

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1838
  • Physicist
    • View Profile
    • New England Science Constortium
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #7 on: 17/09/2013 20:13:49 »
Thanks Pete.  I think it might be too technical for me - doing three online courses at present and not sure I have the time for a book that whilst it looks great would require a huge investment of time for an layman like me.
If you don't mind me asking, what is your major? Is it math, physics or both? If so then it might naturally come up as par for the course. If you take math then it would be a good idea to study this anyway somewhere along the road. Especially if you enjoy physics since it will be helpful somewhere along the road.

Pete
 

Offline imatfaal

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2787
  • rouge moderator
    • View Profile
Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #8 on: 17/09/2013 20:24:01 »
Thanks Pete.  I think it might be too technical for me - doing three online courses at present and not sure I have the time for a book that whilst it looks great would require a huge investment of time for an layman like me.
If you don't mind me asking, what is your major? Is it math, physics or both? If so then it might naturally come up as par for the course. If you take math then it would be a good idea to study this anyway somewhere along the road. Especially if you enjoy physics since it will be helpful somewhere along the road.

Pete

My degrees are both in Law - physics is only a hobby to stave of the grind of work (I wish I was the age to be deciding on a degree course again - but that was last millennium).  The online courses I refer to are mostly physics-based, but also a comp-sci course, and an energy course - these are at edx.org   The physics courses are basically 1st year undergrad (8Mrev, 802 from MITx etc)  good fun and challenging as you get weekly assignments and midterm/final exams
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Emmy Noether's Wonderful Theorem
« Reply #8 on: 17/09/2013 20:24:01 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length