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Author Topic: Is the Universe finitely big?  (Read 956 times)

Offline Brex

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Is the Universe finitely big?
« on: 27/09/2013 12:26:16 »
Is the concept still current, of our three dimensional Universe being finite because it is curved in all directions but in four dimensional space, each of those curvatures being complete (a closed loop) which results in there being no edge to it?
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     So, if this hypothesis were to be correct there could be a pressure (or whatever it may be called in four dimensional space) which is greater on the inside of the closed curvature than outside. This could be the dark matter/energy which is responsible for the greater than expected expansion rate of the Universe. Does anyone know if this idea has been considered by other than me?       
« Last Edit: 29/09/2013 09:46:36 by chris »


 

Offline evan_au

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Re: The Universe
« Reply #1 on: 28/09/2013 06:48:41 »
It's still current, in that no-one has managed to prove it wrong (yet); but no-one has managed to prove it right, either.

So it's still "on the table", along with other more exotic theories like the multiverse theory.
 

Offline Pmb

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Re: The Universe
« Reply #2 on: 28/09/2013 07:01:01 »
Quote from: evan_au
It's still current, in that no-one has managed to prove it wrong (yet); but no-one has managed to prove it right, either.
That's not quite right. First off, no physical theory or concept can ever be proven right. All that we're able to show is what's right and wrong by establishing what does and doesn't work.
« Last Edit: 28/09/2013 07:03:08 by Pmb »
 

lean bean

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Re: The Universe
« Reply #3 on: 28/09/2013 17:35:30 »
Is the concept still current, of our three dimensional Universe being finite because it is curved in all directions but in four dimensional space, each of those curvatures being complete (a closed loop) which results in there being no edge to it?
My bold.
Brex, Did you mean to put four dimensional spacetime? General relatively doesn't need four spatial dimensions.
So, if this hypothesis were to be correct there could be a pressure (or whatever it may be called in four dimensional space) which is greater on the inside of the closed curvature than outside.
Are you thinking the curving is 'done' in a fourth spatial dimension?
« Last Edit: 29/09/2013 10:19:19 by lean bean »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: The Universe
« Reply #3 on: 28/09/2013 17:35:30 »

 

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