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Author Topic: Does matter repel antimatter like a magnet?  (Read 2008 times)

Offline thedoc

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Does matter repel antimatter like a magnet?
« on: 08/10/2013 12:30:01 »
Cleon w  asked the Naked Scientists:
   We know that with magnets, like poles repel, but unlike poles attract. We therefore have a presidency for a repulsive force.

Cosmologists tell us that half of the cosmic 'all' is made of antimatter.

Suppose that with gravity we see the opposite to that of magnets ... Like attracts, while unlike repels. Thus all 'matter' attracts all other 'matter, while all 'antimatter' attracts all other 'antimatter.

But if (for example) an antimatter asteroid approached our solar system, it would be repelled away from it.

Similarly, an antimatter photon would be repelled away, so we would never see it. In fact, any 'source' of antimatter 'light' would appear 'black' since the 'light would be bent away from us. It would therefore 'appear' to us as dark matter.

This would explain why we don't ever seem to see annihilations, which one would expect to be quite a common phenomenon if the two were attracted by gravity.

It would also explain why the expansion of the universe is accelerating; all of the matter would be repelling all of the antimatter (and vice versa), with the net force being slightly greater than the attraction of all matter and (separately) all antimatter...

What do you reckon?

Regards
Cleon White

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 08/10/2013 12:30:01 by _system »


 

Offline Pmb

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Re: Does matter repel antimatter like a magnet?
« Reply #1 on: 08/10/2013 14:17:24 »
Cleon w  asked the Naked Scientists:
   We know that with magnets, like poles repel, but unlike poles attract. We therefore have a presidency for a repulsive force.

Cosmologists tell us that half of the cosmic 'all' is made of antimatter.

Suppose that with gravity we see the opposite to that of magnets ... Like attracts, while unlike repels. Thus all 'matter' attracts all other 'matter, while all 'antimatter' attracts all other 'antimatter.

But if (for example) an antimatter asteroid approached our solar system, it would be repelled away from it.

Similarly, an antimatter photon would be repelled away, so we would never see it. In fact, any 'source' of antimatter 'light' would appear 'black' since the 'light would be bent away from us. It would therefore 'appear' to us as dark matter.

This would explain why we don't ever seem to see annihilations, which one would expect to be quite a common phenomenon if the two were attracted by gravity.

It would also explain why the expansion of the universe is accelerating; all of the matter would be repelling all of the antimatter (and vice versa), with the net force being slightly greater than the attraction of all matter and (separately) all antimatter...

What do you reckon?

Regards
Cleon White

What do you think?
No. The qualifier "anti" refers to things like having opposite charge and spin. It doens't refer to having different gravitational properties. However experients have been done and will continue to be done to confirm this.
 

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Re: Does matter repel antimatter like a magnet?
« Reply #1 on: 08/10/2013 14:17:24 »

 

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