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Author Topic: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Science  (Read 955 times)

Offline Pmb

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Science
« on: 08/10/2013 17:35:49 »
As some of you know I created and organization to help aid science and science eduction using the internet. One of the first things I plan on doing is compiling a list of frequenty asked questions (FAQ). Let's start with physics.

It appears to me that a lot of people have questions relating to the following

1) Why can light generate a gravitational field and respond to one when it has no mass?

2) What effect does motion of the source of a gravitational body have on the gravitational field?

3) How can a neutron, which has no charge, have an antiparticle which is supposed to be a particle with the same mass as neutron but opposite charge?

4) Is gravitational repulsion causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate?

etc.

Please help me generate this list. Please describe what questions you see people ask a great deal of the time. I will do everything I can to get your question answered by a very reliable source. Thank you.
« Last Edit: 09/10/2013 09:38:22 by chris »


 

Offline JP

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Re: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
« Reply #1 on: 08/10/2013 19:18:34 »
If a photon experiences no time, how can it ever interact with anything else?
 

Offline Pmb

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Re: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
« Reply #2 on: 09/10/2013 02:29:30 »
I found a good example of a common misconception. See http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9988-instant-expert-cosmology.html
Quote
The growth of the universe can be modelled with Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which desribes how matter and energy make space-time curve. We feel that curvature as the force of gravity.
Does anybody want to venture a guess as to what's wrong with this statement?
« Last Edit: 14/10/2013 17:10:55 by Pete »
 

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Re: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
« Reply #2 on: 09/10/2013 02:29:30 »

 

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