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Author Topic: What is the science of baking?  (Read 2384 times)

Offline thedoc

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What is the science of baking?
« on: 24/10/2013 09:48:43 »
As a new Great British Bake Off champion is crowned, here's your quick fire science on baking...

Read the whole story on our website by clicking here

  
« Last Edit: 24/10/2013 09:48:43 by _system »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: What is the science of baking?
« Reply #1 on: 24/10/2013 11:17:06 »
Nice article about baking.  I think baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) also is designed to release carbon dioxide during baking, causing the product to raise.

Many grains, as well as grapes contain natural yeasts.  One can culture one's on yeast by simply mixing flour and water and letting it sit.  Preferably the less processed flours, I think.  One often gets a yeast/lactobacillus co-culture which can then impart a nice tart flavor to one's bread.
 

Offline cheryl j

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Re: What is the science of baking?
« Reply #2 on: 06/11/2013 01:46:55 »
One of the most interesting aspects of baking is oil/water mix in pastry, and getting it to do what you want. Also gluten.
« Last Edit: 06/11/2013 01:48:45 by cheryl j »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: What is the science of baking?
« Reply #3 on: 06/11/2013 08:50:22 »
I can recommend "Cooking for Geeks". It covers the chemistry of a good steak in great detail.
I especially liked the recipe for making ice-cream with liquid nitrogen.
 

Offline chiralSPO

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Re: What is the science of baking?
« Reply #4 on: 06/11/2013 14:58:14 »
The Maillard reaction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction) is one of the most important reactions that can occur in baking--it is largely responsible for the wonderful aromas of toast and seared steak. It is the reaction of sugars with protein, which goes significantly faster at higher temperatures. In fact the reaction does progress, albeit very slowly, in the human body. Excess sugar in the blood reacting with proteins by this reaction is a major part of how diabetes damages the body, and buildup of the end-products of this reaction have been implicated in many degenerative diseases.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: What is the science of baking?
« Reply #4 on: 06/11/2013 14:58:14 »

 

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