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Author Topic: What treatments are available to help give up smoking?  (Read 2840 times)

Offline SimpleEngineer

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Okay now no mumbo jumbo, sticking pins into me, standing in a cold puddle with one trouser leg rolled up, or any quack medicine.

I need to give up smoking.. I have the willpower of a monkey with the keys to the plantation.. So I suck big time at giving up. NRT just doesnt work, makes me feel sick and even if i run the course for twice as long as it recommends I still  cant give up (it does reduce the amount of smoking i do for 6 months afterwards though)

I did try one pill, though and it totally destroyed any craving, and made me feel sick when i did try to smoke.. I unfortunately only got 1 course (2 weeks) and this stopped me from smoking for about 4 months.. I could not get a repeat prescription as I moved away from that doctors and the new one wouldnt continue it without me attending multiple support groups.. (not possible as I work.. funny they dont think of that when they plan these groups for mid week)

SO... any available over the counter approximations to the pills? or any other ideas.. as I am all out of patience with me poisoning myself..

(I will allow discussion on hypnotherapy if personal experience is provided, not " a friend of a cousins brother in law" type jobby.. just leave acupuncture out of it..)
« Last Edit: 11/11/2013 19:15:21 by chris »


 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #1 on: 07/11/2013 12:09:43 »
I gave up smoking when I started flying. Couldn't afford both, so simple choice: one trial flight, sign up for the full course, end of ciggies. By the time I qualified, I'd lost all interest in tobacco.  Forget pills and crap, just take up an expensive and difficult hobby like aviation or sailing, and any time you feel like a cig, read a textbook or study a nav chart instead - if you are a mechanical or electronic engineer it may even turn into a career.
« Last Edit: 07/11/2013 12:12:16 by alancalverd »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #2 on: 07/11/2013 13:25:30 »
In the USA, Zyban is licensed as a smoking cessation pill.  It contains the same ingredients as the antidepressant, Wellbutrin.  I believe it is now available as a generic.  However, they both would be prescription drugs. 

Perhaps there would be support groups available during the evenings, or weekends.  I am sure there are multiple different drug addiction support groups, from alcohol to narcotics.  While you may not have a problem with alcohol, perhaps there would be enough overlap that you would benefit from the group, and your physician will be satisfied with the effort.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #3 on: 07/11/2013 14:37:31 »
There's an app for that ... http://smokefree.nhs.uk/quit-tools/quit-apps/

[ for chemical dependency the usual strategy is to slowly taper-off the dose over a period of weeks or months ]
« Last Edit: 07/11/2013 15:03:26 by RD »
 

Offline evan_au

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #4 on: 07/11/2013 19:08:50 »
There are also many psychological aspects to giving up on addictions.
Think back to when you previously tried giving up - what caused a relapse?
One aspect that seems to be important is removing oneself from the environment(s) that are mentally associated with the addiction, as these can trigger cravings and a relapse.

"Giving up smoking is the easiest thing in the world. I know because I've done it thousands of times." ...Mark Twain
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #5 on: 07/11/2013 19:38:47 »
"Giving up smoking is the easiest thing in the world. I know because I've done it thousands of times." ...Mark Twain

Oh, it reminds me of a book that I've read a while ago.

La coscienza di Zeno by Italo Svevo.  I believe it has been translated into English, Zeno's Conscience by Italo Svevo. 

I don't remember much about the book, but a major theme throughout the book was "L'ultima sigaretta", or the last cigarette.  Apparently the act of quitting, and smoking the last cigarette was very rewarding.  Then, after quitting, there was nothing to keep him from resuming smoking, and having another last cigarette. 

As far as truly making a change in your life, one thing will be to generate the support you really need.  Do you smoke with friends or family?  Try to work it out so you quit with the support of your friends and coworkers.  Can everyone quit at the same time.

Have you smoked in your car?  Perhaps consider getting your car professionally cleaned/detailed after quitting.  Your house too?  Perhaps going through the energy and expense of cleaning the smoke tar out of everything you own will help create a little extra distance between yourself and the habit. 

I will say, one of the things I detest the most is cleaning a computer that has been used by a smoker.  It is amazing how the tar covered dust coats everything.
 

Offline bizerl

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #6 on: 08/11/2013 00:50:43 »
I'll throw in my two cents. It took me a lot of practice to finally quit. I had tried a few times (longest stint was almost 12 months) but then I fell into the trap of "I've quit now, so an occasionally ciggie won't worry me..."

I suffer mild asthma as well so at the worst stage I found myself with a cigarette in one hand and an asthma puffer in the other.

When I finally managed to quit for good, I'd led up to it by smoking the lowest milligram cigarettes available (I realise there's a debate in itself about whether these are actually less toxic) and I was lucky enough to have the support of my then girlfriend (now wife).

It was cold turkey for me, I just couldn't go another day of smoking. I don't remember any withdrawals but the hardest thing I found was not having something to do. When I used to go for smoke breaks at work, I couldn't do that now. I also quit coffee because a smoke and a coffee always went hand in hand for me.

Above all, I tried to maintain in my mind the horrible rough feeling in my throat that cigarettes gave me and the stink that would hang around after. I made sure that I never took up smoking again and that I never felt safe as a non-smoker to just "try it" again. (although apparently I had one on my bucks night, but I don't think it counts if you don't remember it!).

I don't know what it's like in UK but in Australia, it is SO EXPENSIVE to smoke! So I'm with Alan on the expensive hobby. everytime you think about buying a packet, put the money you would have spent in a jar and buy yourself something nice!
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #7 on: 08/11/2013 03:09:00 »
Well, smoking in moderation may actually be cheaper than drinking your favorite cup of flavored coffee for $5 EACH.

I've reached a point where I've mostly quit coffee as I fear that it may be causing cardiac irregularities, and I'd rather quit coffee than take rat poison (warfarin/coumadin).

I still occasionally have a cup when driving 100+ miles.  But, when I feel the craving, I just have to tell myself that I don't want to become addicted again, and I don't want the rat poison alternative.

There are some alcoholics that can occasionally have a glass of wine, but they are rare, and perhaps some smokers that can also have a rare cigarette or cigar.

I would imagine, however, that smoking 1 cigarette a week would be better than smoking a few packs a day, but it would continually aggravate the lungs, as well as the kidneys and bladder, so it wouldn't be nearly as protective as completely quitting.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #8 on: 08/11/2013 08:33:17 »
I've reached a point where I've mostly quit coffee as I fear that it may be causing cardiac irregularities, and I'd rather quit coffee than take rat poison (warfarin/coumadin)

More likely foxglove-extract for cardiac arrhythmia than rat-poison.

 

Offline SimpleEngineer

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #9 on: 08/11/2013 08:36:14 »
I only smoke at work and in the car (dont smoke at home as since my last quitting attempt i havent the heart to tell my wife i have started again.. although I am positive she knows anyway)

Its typically the car journeys, I drive about 1.5 hours to work and back, spending 45 minutes of that stuck in traffic.. this si when i have failed each time.. I tried the clean and detail (I bought a new car the last time i gave up) and it does not make a difference, I started off by pulling over to have a smoke when i was getting stressed, but now just open the window.

I also have 3-4 cigs over the day whilst at work.. at the times I used to smoke (was very regimented at sea.. I smoked at 10-10:30, 12:30-1:30 and 3-3:30) and funnily enough my cravings exist around these times. (and when i drive)

I now do not get cravings or irritable at home even when i dont make alone time have a cig at the weekends. (used to find a reason to go out in the car somewhere)

But, I need to stop. NRT really doesnt work for me, the cravings return and I have little willpower (especially when getting frustrated in a long traffic queue)
 

Offline RD

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #10 on: 08/11/2013 09:23:53 »
... NRT really doesnt work for me

even electronic-cigarettes ? ...

Quote
The BMA encourages health professionals to recommend conventional nicotine replacement therapies, but for patients unwilling to use or continue those methods, they say health professionals may present e-cigarettes as a lower-risk option than tobacco smoking.
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-cigarettes
« Last Edit: 08/11/2013 09:28:12 by RD »
 

Offline SimpleEngineer

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #11 on: 08/11/2013 11:10:15 »
Yeah i have three of these.. its not the same.. they dont even have the same impact of patches.. :(

If they were cheaper so i could find one that works for me.. yeah i would keep trying but.. so far they are not even close to replacing the nicotine or feeling of smoking a cigarette.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #12 on: 08/11/2013 12:57:24 »
Yeah i have three of these.. its not the same..

Not even simultaneously :) ...
[:0]
« Last Edit: 08/11/2013 13:07:25 by RD »
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #13 on: 08/11/2013 21:04:50 »
If the Wellbutrin/Zyban worked in the past, then find a doctor that will prescribe them. 
But, also heed the advice to find or develop the support you will need to keep off the cigs.
 

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Re: Quitting smoking
« Reply #13 on: 08/11/2013 21:04:50 »

 

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