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Author Topic: Does matter naturally want to fit into the smallest space possible?  (Read 1402 times)

Offline jeffreyH

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During the evolution of the universe it appears that the formation of stars and galaxies was an inevitable consequence. Does this indicate a propensity for matter to assume the most compact and ordered state possible and is this a reason that matter forms into solids?


 

Offline spartaman64

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Matter forms into solids when kinetic energy is no longer is strong enough to keep the matter from bonding with each other.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Matter forms into solids when kinetic energy is no longer is strong enough to keep the matter from bonding with each other.

OK. To rephrase, why is there a reduction in kinetic energy?
 

Offline Pmb

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Quote from: jeffreyH
During the evolution of the universe it appears that the formation of stars and galaxies was an inevitable consequence. Does this indicate a propensity for matter to assume the most compact and ordered state possible and is this a reason that matter forms into solids?
You're not clear on what you mean by "nature." In another universe with the same laws of nature but where only electrons existed that wouldn't happen. Is that the same "nature" as this one?
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Quote from: jeffreyH
During the evolution of the universe it appears that the formation of stars and galaxies was an inevitable consequence. Does this indicate a propensity for matter to assume the most compact and ordered state possible and is this a reason that matter forms into solids?
You're not clear on what you mean by "nature." In another universe with the same laws of nature but where only electrons existed that wouldn't happen. Is that the same "nature" as this one?

The properties I am discussing would only apply to what happens in the universe we inhabit. This cannot be applied to a universe with different laws of physics. Temperature has a direct link to gravitation in our universe. Temperature also has a direct link to solidification. A direct link between thermodynamics and gravitation needs a mathematical model based on particle physics. This should relate to mass-energy density, possibly but not necessarily, with an inclusion of a spin 2 particle. There appears to be a significant relationship between inter-molecular bonding and gravitational field strength. This is why a solid will fall to the ground and a gas will not. Gasses are more like fluids and fluid dynamics can be applied to gasses. Liquids are an intermediate state that will flow at the surface but do not remain stationary. Apologies for stating the obvious but these relationships need a new method of observation. What we think of as buoyancy is also not as straightforward as we imagine.
 

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