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Author Topic: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?  (Read 233441 times)

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #25 on: 10/10/2006 19:35:29 »
Hello Iko,
  If  you can scan it to me that will be great. If not, I will check with the scientist where I have my web page. He is a research scientist and may be interested in this too. He might be able to get a copy from his university's librarary if you cannot scan it. As soon as I am more informed, it will be possible to contribute more to this discussion. Thanks!
Later,
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #26 on: 13/10/2006 05:29:07 »
Hi Iko,
  In a Las Cruces bookstore today I picked up a copy of a book  “Low-Level Radiation,” a subject that interests me. It was written by Ernest j. Sternglass, who for decades has been alerting the world about the dangers of low-level radiation; he taught Radiation Physics at the University of Pittsburg. This book is much about leukemia, changing rates since nuclear testing began. It was published in 1972 and is very well documented. I did a google search on Sternglass  which turned up several hundred links, including the press release below. Maybe you are familiar with him?  
 And the Cod Liver Oil Connection:
A PubMed search of “cod liver oil” and “radiation” turned up the Shanghai report abstract and three others.
A Google search on “radiation sickness” and “cod liver oil” gives about 300 links [not many academic.” At PubMedCentral, there is a wealth of early research on cod liver oil, it was used as a treatment for cancer in the mid 1800s. I hope this is not a repeat for you, but this article is very interesting:
The Non-Surgical Cure of Cancer.
Nicholson D.
Can Med Assoc J. 1937 Jul; 37(1): 76-80.
PMCID: 1562281
| Summary | Page Browse | PDF-1.1M |


http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/picrender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&blobtype=pdf&artid=1562281.

Regards,
Zoey

http://www.radiation.org/spotlight/florida.html


Spotlight
Press Release
For Immediate Release
April 9, 2003, 11:00 A.M.
Contact: Lisa Palley, (305) 642-3132
Jerry Brown, Ph.D., (305) 321-5612 (cell)
Ernest Sternglass, Ph.D., (305) 321-5612

Childhood Cancer in South Florida
Study Finds Cause in Nuclear Plant Radiation Emissions -
Drinking Water Most Likely Source
Miami, Florida - A South Florida Baby Teeth and Cancer Case Study, that was officially released today, finds that infants and children are especially vulnerable to cancer caused by federally-permitted radiation releases from nuclear reactors, such as the Turkey Point and St. Lucie nuclear power plants, located in southeast Florida.
The five-year baby teeth study, also known as the "Tooth Fairy Project," found a 37% rise in the average levels of radioactive Strontium-90 (Sr-90) in southeast Florida baby teeth from the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. When compared with baby teeth collected from 18 Florida counties, the highest levels of Sr-90 were found in the six southeast Florida counties closest to the Turkey Point and St. Lucie nuclear reactors: Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River.
The current rise of radiation levels in baby teeth in Florida and in the U.S. as a whole reverses a long-term downward trend in Sr-90 levels since the 1960s, after President Kennedy banned aboveground testing of nuclear weapons 1963, due to concerns about increasing childhood cancer and leukemia rates from fallout.
Radioactive Sr-90 is a known carcinogen, which is only produced by fission reactions in nuclear weapons or reactors. It enters the body along with chemically similar calcium, and is stored in bone and teeth, where it can be measured years later using well-established laboratory techniques.
Significantly, the study documented that the average levels of Sr-90 found in the teeth of children diagnosed with cancer were nearly twice as high as those found in the teeth of children without cancer.
Dr. Ernest Sternglass, Professor Emeritus of Radiation Physics at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School and co-author of the study said that "although radioactive emissions can enter the air, soil and diet, the most significant source of Sr-90 in southeast Florida children's teeth is groundwater, the primary source of southeast Florida's public drinking supply. This is due to the area's high rainfall and shallow aquifer."
The study found the highest levels of radioactivity in samples of drinking water found within 20 miles of the Turkey Point (located south of Miami) and St. Lucie (located north of West Palm Beach) nuclear power plants, while levels of radioactivity were significantly lower in water samples further away from the reactors.
The rise in Sr-90 levels in both drinking water and baby teeth parallels a 32.5% rise in cancer rates in children under 10 in the southeast Florida counties, which are closest to the nuclear power plants. This compares with a average 10.8% rise in national childhood cancer rates from the early 1980s to the late 1990s.
The baby teeth study conclusions are consistent with the recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency admission that children age 2 and younger are 10 times more susceptible than adults to the cancer causing effects of toxic chemicals and radioactivity. According to the National Cancer Institute's SEER Cancer Statistics Review, from early 1970s to late 1990s, U.S. childhood cancer overall has increased by 26%, brain cancer by 50%, leukemia by 45% and bone cancer by 40%.
"There is now substantial evidence that exposure to federally-permitted radiation releases from nuclear reactors is a significant cause of increasing childhood cancer rates in southeast Florida, as well as a risk factor for cancer in Americans of all ages," said Dr. Jerry Brown, the study's co-author and Founding Professor, Florida International University in Miami.
Dr. Brown noted that, "the recent 2003 Recommendations of the European Committee on Radiation Risk found that the world-wide health effects of very low levels of radioactivity have been vastly underestimated."
In a Statement on Baby Teeth Study, Samuel Epstein, M.D., wrote, "Given prior evidence of the relationship between childhood cancer and radioactive emissions from 103 aging nuclear power plants in the U.S., and the well established biological risks of radioactive Strontium-90, it is now critical to recognize that radioactive emissions from commercial nuclear power plants pose a grave threat to public health in southeast Florida and throughout the nation." Dr. Epstein is Professor Emeritus of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health, and Chairman, Cancer Prevention Coalition.
The study was conducted by the Radiation and Public Health Project (RPHP) and funded by the Health Foundation of South Florida. The Radiation and Pubic Health Project is an independent not-for-profit research organization, established by scientists and physicians to investigate the links between environmental radiation, cancer and public health.
The Health Foundation of South Florida, a not-for-profit grantmaking foundation, is dedicated to expanding access to affordable, quality health care and providing funding that directly benefits the health and well being of underserved individuals in Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties. Since its inception in 1993, the Foundation has awarded more than $42 million in grants and direct program support.
Available for Interview at Press Conference
- Dr. Ernest Sternglass, Chief Scientist, RPHP; Professor Emeritus, Radiation Physics, University of Pittsburgh Medical School; co-Principal Investigator of the Report.
- Dr. Jerry Brown, Research Associate, RPHP; Founding Professor, Florida International University; co-Principal Investigator of the Report. (English and Spanish)
- Lilyana and Bill Sager (Lilly), Miami, Florida, daughter diagnosed with cancer submitted tooth to study. Ms. Sanger will discuss why she supports the baby teeth study, her reactions to findings, and her concerns over increasing cancer in the Cutler Ridge area of South Miami-Dade County (English and Spanish)
- Lee Klein, CEO, Children's Cancer Caring Center, founder of organization that provides free medical care to needy families of children with cancer in South Florida and throughout Latin America.
- Steven Marcus, President and CEO, and Peter Wood, Chief Program Officer, Health Foundation of South Florida, an independent not for profit organization benefiting community healthcare and education. The Health Foundation funded the South Florida Baby Teeth and Cancer Case Study.
- Barbara Garrett, Senior Vice President, Applica Inc., a Miami Lakes-company that has supported the national baby teeth study.

Available for interviews by phone:
- Samuel S. Epstein, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health and Chairman, Cancer Prevention Coalition. Dr. Epstein has reviewed the Research Report and provided a written Statement on Baby Teeth Study
- Dr. Hari Sharma, President, Radiological and Environmental Measurement Systems, Waterloo, Canada. Dr. Sharma is an international expert in radiological measurements and manages the independent lab that tests the baby teeth.
- Debi Santoro, mother who's infant has nerve cancer and who has submitted tooth to study and had her water tested.
- Audra Malone-Schmidt, mother of child with cancer who submitted tooth to study.
- Dava Michaelson, mother and breast cancer survivor, who has submitted daughter's tooth to the study.


 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #27 on: 13/10/2006 22:56:49 »
Thank you Zoey for the 1937 paper!
http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/picrender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&blobtype=pdf&artid=1562281.
I like 'historical' reports and I ignore most of them, I'm sorry about that.
I'm pretty sure that CLO wouldn't work alone as a treatment...as I am aware that it had probably been tested in unfortunate patients when nothing else was available.
The point in childhood leukemia and cod liver oil is more subtle: it could help as a nutritional support the minority of patients that do badly with standard treatments .  After initial chemo, the bad cells totally disappear (remission) and patients become 'normal kids' again, suffering only from the toxicity of the following therapy (reinduction and maintenance).  There should be enough time - over one year - to benefit from the protective effect found in normal children in the Shanghai report.
It is a hope supported by weak epidemiological evidence.

I do not follow much the radiation-leukemia connection.  I tend to stay more on the other side, where disease is already started and talking of prevention is a bit useless...

I know that when we had Chernobyl fallout (my wife took a walk in the rain with our 2yrs old kid) my second son was an embryo of few weeks...but we had no increase of leukemia cases related to that event in the whole Europe, as far as I know.

He had a mycoplasma infection when he got sick, and certainly that was the last infectious 'hit', according to Mel Greaves's theory (by the way, why didn't he get a Nobel Prize yet?)



Mel Greaves                                    Mycoplasma pneumoniae





iko
« Last Edit: 09/04/2007 13:59:51 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #28 on: 14/10/2006 03:26:33 »
Hello Iko,
  I find it useful to get a historical context on a subject that catches my interest. It helps me understand it, and think about it with a sense of how the perception has changed over time. These early studies on radiation exposure found there was a timeline for the increase in leukemia to appear, an average number of years. Initially, the studies were refuted, but later validated. When we consider how widespread radiation exposure is, we may also want to consider more subtle effects than that of leukemia. Also, do you think a child's level of vitamins A and D would affect the tendency to develop leukemia? If so, would children living in areas where deficiency in these nutrients are common might have a higher incidence of developing the disease?
Getting back onto the subject of treatment, what other nutritional factors do you think would work along with cod liver oil to overcome the negative effects of treatment?

 IThis link is to Columbia University's oncology program on integrative treatment of children with cancer.They include a link to current studies that are recruiting also. http://www.integrativetherapiesprogram.org/research/studies/anti.php
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #29 on: 14/10/2006 03:38:48 »
Hey Iko,
   I looked over that site at Columbia. Some of those folks may not have heard of the Shanghai report, and surely would be interested if they weren't aware of it.
Zoey
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #30 on: 14/10/2006 10:09:01 »
Hi Zoey,
we're making an hypertopic here...
It's nice to quit my monologue for a change!
quote:
...
Also, do you think a child's level of vitamins A and D would affect the tendency to develop leukemia? If so, would children living in areas where deficiency in these nutrients are common might have a higher incidence of developing the disease?
Getting back onto the subject of treatment, what other nutritional factors do you think would work along with cod liver oil to overcome the negative effects of treatment?
Zoey


If we consider a multifactorial etiology in a fortunately rare disease, vitamin D and A+omega-3 may play a minor role together with all the rest.  Other factors interacting make quite difficult to catch a significant difference.

In underdeveloped countries leukemias are less represented compared to lymphomas. Urban (and wealthy?) people seem to be more exposed.
We may expect that a malnourished child, affected by multiple deficiencies could die from infection way before developing a leukemia (Hypothesis!).
If you search for a connection with lower vitamin D levels...well in USA coloured children have a slightly higher incidence of this disease.  This is just speculating...vitamin D levels should be tested more extensively after the Mansoura study in Egypt.
In my opinion, this would be the only way to estabilish a connection.

Other nutritional factors -mainly antioxidants- may help to overcome the negative effects of treatment.

It was summer then, and we had tons of squeezed icy lemon juice and fresh garlic bread from time to time (pure empirism)...

There are some studies about eating more healthy food and avoiding some toxic effect...

 
quote:
Low antioxidant vitamin intakes are associated with increases in adverse effects of chemotherapy in children witn acute lymphoblastic leukemia


...Chemotherapy leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species, which stresses the antioxidant defense system. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia rarely are overtly malnourished, which makes this population ideal for an investigation of the relations between dietary antioxidant consumption, plasma antioxidant concentrations, and chemotherapy-induced toxicity.
...a 6-mo observational study of 103 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma micronutrient concentrations, dietary intakes, and incidence of side effects of chemotherapy were ascertained at diagnosis and after 3 and 6 mo of therapy...

Conclusion: A large percentage of children undergoing treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia have inadequate intakes of antioxidants and vitamin A. Lower intakes of antioxidants are associated with increases in the adverse side effects of chemotherapy
Kennedy D et al. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79:1029-36.


http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/6/1029

 
quote:
Antioxidant-Rich Diet Helps Fight Leukemia

As if undergoing chemotherapy isn't trying enough, kids with the most common form of childhood leukemia receiving this treatment may also experience a significant reduction in their antioxidant and micronutrient levels. This decrease could lead to severe side effects from the chemotherapy. However, there may be a ray of hope amidst this dark cloud.  According to a study, children could improve antioxidant and micronutrient levels and prevent some of the adverse side effects of chemotherapy by simply incorporating more fruits and vegetables into their diets.  The study, prompted by parental concern regarding children's safety in taking antioxidant supplements (such supplements might affect the high cure rate experienced with leukemia), involved more than 100 recently diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The children had their antioxidant levels, antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage measured during their first six months of chemotherapy treatment.

Findings

Blood levels of vitamin E decreased over time, while vitamin A and total carotenoids increased
Vitamin C and oxidative damage increased within the first few months and declined by the sixth month.
Antioxidant levels were associated with side effects of the treatment; antioxidant capacity decreased throughout the course of the study
Children with higher concentrations of vitamins A, E and total carotenoids experienced fewer poor outcomes (such as infections and toxicity)
Based on the findings, researchers emphasized the importance of eating more fruits and vegetables -- which may provide a more balanced mix of antioxidants -- in addition to working with a nutritionist to improve the child's diet.
Forbes.com December 27, 2004.
Cancerpage.com December 27, 2004

Dr. Mercola's Comment:
It is no surprise that kids can better withstand the toll of chemotherapy by eating a diet full of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. However, one needs to be VERY careful about using any product, even natural ones, as the ONLY approach to treating a complex illness like cancer, as it is likely to be counterproductive. For this reason, I have pulled together a list of alternatives to fight cancer.
Healthy Alternatives to Fight Cancer
1. Avoid sugar, as it is the primary fuel for most cancers.
Eating too much sugar and too many grains -- which are converted to sugar in the body -- will cause your blood sugar levels to rise. If your blood sugar levels remain elevated, even mildly, over a period of time, your risk of developing cancer increases.
Since I am fully aware that many people struggle with this sugar/grain restriction, I highly recommend using the energy psychology tool Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) to successfully treat stresses, including food cravings such as those related to sugar and grains.

2. Optimize your vitamin D levels, as it is probably the single most important vitamin in preventing and treating cancers.

The safest way to maintain healthy vitamin D levels is through sun exposure, but many of us are not able to do that in the winter, and some of us also stay indoors in the summer. For those that don't obtain enough sun exposure, taking a high-quality cod liver oil is a reasonable alternative. Taking a high-quality cod liver oil is more important than any supplement you can take because it is not a supplement at all -- it is an essential food...

NOTE: It important to have your vitamin D levels checked, as it is possible to overdose on vitamin D.

Sunlight, which causes us to produce vitamin D, can also help lower the risk of many cancers. Sunlight might actually be helpful in treating cancers directly through some, as yet, unidentified mechanism. One of my favorite books from last year, The Healing Sun Tom place link, provides some further details about this approach.
3. Make sure you exercise, as this will help lower your insulin levels.
There is no shortage of literature documenting the major benefits exercise has in lowering the risk of cancer and improving cancer once it is diagnosed. One of the major ways exercise works is by reducing insulin levels. It is quite clear that elevated insulin levels are associated with an increased risk of cancer.
When using exercise as a drug it will be important to have a goal of at least one hour per day, every day if you have high insulin levels or signs of them, such as:
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Overweight
Diabetes
Obviously, depending on one's current condition, one needs to work slowly up to this level. My experience is that weight-bearing exercises, such as walking, jogging, running and elliptical machines, are better than cycling and swimming. If you are already in shape then you can limit your workouts to 45 minutes three or four times per week. However, if you are already in shape; then it is likely you won't have cancer, as many studies show that people who exercise have far less cancer rates...
Dr. Joseph Mercola


http://www.mercola.com/2005/jan/12/antioxidant_leukemia.htm

...perhaps even my Granny knew that...
iko
« Last Edit: 16/10/2006 14:29:41 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #31 on: 14/10/2006 13:41:49 »
Thanks for the address Zoey!
I just sent an e-mail to carolann@columbia.edu
...another copy of the Shanghai report is flying over the Ocean...

ikod




 
quote:
...Every summer, thousands of barrels of cod liver oil were transported on cargo vessels, the so-called "jekt"s, from Lofoten to Bergen and further on to Europe.
Fish, liver and roes, cooked together and referred to as "mølje", have always been an important and healthy part of the coastal people’s diet. Vitamins A and D and the Omega 3 unsaturated fatty acids in the cod liver oil, helped keep people healthy. It was often said that the cod liver oil makers and other people that took a lot of cod liver oil were seemingly never ill.
Medicinal Cod Liver Oil
Pharmacist Peter Møller wanted to introduce more people to the healthy effects of cod liver oil. In 1854, he built a lined cauldron, filled the space between the cauldron and its lining with water, and steamboiled the fresh cod livers. In this way he greatly improved the quality of the oil. The invention of medicinal cod liver oil was honoured with awards at many trade fairs in Norway and abroad. Later, the cod liver was steamed in conical oak barrels. In order to extract the last remaining drops of precious cod liver oil, the residue of the liver was then squeezed in a liver press before going to the manufacture of cattle feed or fertiliser.

Today, much of the old production equipment can still be seen in the cod liver oil factory at the Norwegian Fishing Village Museum in Å. Cod liver oil is still produced there in the old fashioned manner, and small bottles of it together with cod liver oil lamps are on sale as mementoes from Lofoten.




The cod liver oil Factory

from: Norwegian Fishing Village Museum
http://www.lofoten-info.no/history.htm#5

ikod

« Last Edit: 17/10/2006 18:54:43 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #32 on: 15/10/2006 04:27:46 »
I read much of Kurlansky's book several years ago. Interesting! I take my cod liver oil straight. Great about the request for another copy of the Shanghai Report. It will be very interesting to see what comes of it.
  When searching out information on vitamin D, for an article, I came across one that is lesser known, but may have a place in this discussion. I couldn't include it in my article so didn't keep the information. I will go back and look for it again.
  Regarding nutritional factors: World Watch published a report in 2000 on the issue of being overfed yet malnourished [http://www.alternet.org/story/274/]. I read that report and it raises some good issues on our assumptions about hunger. We think of malnourishment in terms of money when the cause may be cultural and having the money to buy the less nutritious delicacies.
   If you look for a connection between vitamin D status and the rate of disease development you may well find the highest rates in areas where there is the least exposure to sunlight. When gathering information on this, nearly every child in numerous major cities around the world had some signs of rickets around 1900. This included, New York, London, Paris, and many other cities. So, it might be of value to see if these areas have the highest rates of leukemia. I would like to know more about how leukemia develops, whether it can be viewed as a type of degenerative process or what. I have a lot of studying to do on this.
   Guess what! I just did a google search on vitamin D and leukemia and this report turned up:

Excerpt.

A Leader in Leukemia Research and Treatment
by Mark Wright

from Visions, Fall/Winter 2004

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center teams are at the forefront of novel treatment approaches and drug discovery for treatment of leukemia. While doctors once considered leukemia a single disease, a malignancy of the blood cells, today they have identified at least a dozen varieties, allowing for highly targeted treatment approaches.
.....
 
Featured Article
 
A Leader in Leukemia Research and Treatment
by Mark Wright

from Visions, Fall/Winter 2004

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center teams are at the forefront of novel treatment approaches and drug discovery for treatment of leukemia. While doctors once considered leukemia a single disease, a malignancy of the blood cells, today they have identified at least a dozen varieties, allowing for highly targeted treatment approaches.

In the 1980s, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center became one of the first in the country to use high-dose cytarabine to treat relapsed leukemia, which contributed to Wake Forest’s becoming a national center for leukemia treatment.

Today more than 80 percent of the acute leukemia patients who come to Wake Forest Baptist are eligible for a clinical trial, many of which start here — facts that put this medical center among the leading leukemia research facilities in the nation.

“Our patients are participating in trials that are started here, in addition to national studies,” explained Bayard L. Powell, M.D., director of the leukemia service. “So when patients come here, they receive cutting-edge therapy.

“Leukemia is certainly one of our areas of focus and always has been, and we are active participants in the leading national trials.”

Powell, section head of hematology and oncology, also serves on the committee of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) that develops national leukemia trials, “so we’re very closely aligned with CALGB for studies for untreated patients.”

He said that Wake Forest Baptist currently has about 15 clinical trials underway in leukemia research, with over half of leukemia patients involved in one or more clinical research studies.

It was hardly more than 50 years ago that leukemia — a malignancy involving the blood cells — was thought to be just one disease. Now, however, hematologists and oncologists know that there are at least a dozen varieties of leukemia. They know that, as is often the case with leukemia, a drug may work very well for one patient but for others with the “same” type of leukemia the drug may not work at all or only marginally well.

If more diseases or subcategories are discovered, “it will look more complicated, but in fact it will become simpler to address, because then you will be able to really talk about a single entity,” said Istvan Molnar, M.D., an assistant professor of hematology-oncology who is experimenting with vitamin D in fighting the preleukemic condition called myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).
 
---
http://www1.wfubmc.edu/articles/Leukemia+Research

Maybe you know this researcher already?
---
  I will look more into antioxidants also.I hope to post more discussion on disease as a "natural process." If we think of illness in these terms we can allow ourselves to see and explore possibilities for healing we might otherwise exclude from consideration.
Regards,
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #33 on: 15/10/2006 04:45:02 »
Have you searched much on vitamin E and Leukemia?
Zoey

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8272150&dopt=Abstract
Note:     Performing your original search, "vitamin E" "leukemia", in PubMed will retrieve 138 citations.  

Neoplasma. 1993;40(4):235-40. Related Articles, Links  


Vitamin E--its status and role in leukemia and lymphoma.

Dasgupta J, Sanyal U, Das S.

Department of Experimental Leukemia, Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, Calcutta, India.

A comparative study has been performed on the relationship between vitamin E and immunofunction in normal and malignant condition in human and murine systems. Further, the effects of supplemental vitamin E on tumor take, host survival and tumor growth have been studied in a transplantable lymphoma in mice. Vitamin E was assayed in serum samples from normal subjects and from patients with leukemia and lymphoma by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The murine group included Dalton's ascitic lymphoma (DL), Schwartz lymphoblastic leukemia (SVL) and Moloney lymphoblastic leukemia (MVL). Serum vitamin E was found to be lower than that of the normal controls in all cases of leukemia and lymphoma both in human and animal system. The levels of immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) were found to be higher in mice with leukemia and lymphoma. Supplementary vitamin E administered at the initial phase of development of murine lymphomas reduced the rate of tumor growth, improved host survival and elevated serum vitamin E level. Vitamin E supplementation also activated specific mitogen induced blastogenesis of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and elevated serum IgG level. IgM remained unaltered and macrophage activity did not seem to be affected. The present findings indicated a low status of vitamin E in tumor bearing host and a beneficial effect of supplemental vitamin E on the host which was mediated by the host immune system.

PMID: 8272150 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #34 on: 15/10/2006 07:00:19 »
Hi Zoey,

quote:

...If more diseases or subcategories are discovered, “it will look more complicated, but in fact it will become simpler to address, because then you will be able to really talk about a single entity,” said Istvan Molnar, M.D., an assistant professor of hematology-oncology who is experimenting with vitamin D in fighting the preleukemic condition called myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).
from Zoey


Different subtypes of ALL and AML had been recognized over the years, by morphology (microscope) staining slides of bone marrow or peripheral blood over 100yrs ago, then cytochemistry to spot enzymes in different cells, then targeting specific membrane proteins by monoclonal antibodies.
Today DNA technology allows a further study of altered genes (when present), extremely precise compared to the chromosome map of the old days.
The complexity of these molecular characteristics and defects in the leukemic cells of different subtypes is not the aim of this topic.  Even working quite close to this area of investigation, I am not in a position to discuss it properly.


As you perfectly know by now, I am stressing just one point:

-The real cause of a disease is still practically unknown.
-Highly toxic treatment cannot resolve it properly (>95% should be cured).
-A protective effect by a common inexpensive nutrient has been serendipitously found in 1988.
-All patients concerned should be informed as soon as possible.
-Some of them will take the nutrient for enough time to allow all the statistical calculations needed to eventually prove a benefit.

-The efficacy of our standard treatment protocols won't be altered:
it represents the best chance of survival these patients can be offered today.
A very high price in terms of years of investigation and human suffering has been payed for that.

Vitamin E is a sort of 'orphan' in this field: a real clinical disease deriving from its deficiency is still a matter of debate. I wouldn't go for it...especially now.

Vitamin D in pre-leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes has been used since the '80s with satisfactory results.  It could be one of the main pieces in this puzzle.

But we should stick to the natural mix, even if it's impossible to get a satisfactory standard product like with synthetic drugs.
We could pay a high price for not doing it: remember the Vitamin A and cancer issue.
So it should be up to patients only to decide whether or not trying this path.
Clinicians are not in a position to recommend it, for many reasons I can understand.

Unfortunately I have been unable to evoke any interest about this CLO topic so far.
I already know the skeptical reaction of collegues of mine that I had been friend with for years, so I can easily imagine angry and endless discussions with part of the scientific community.

In this context my position is definitively on the parents/patients' side.

"autoquote":
Today's patients and children's parents cannot afford to wait for a scientific confirmation, they need more hope and a little help right NOW.
ikod


Zoey, thank you so much for helping me to examine this subject in depth and burn my english dictionary!

By the way, I learned how to 'post' pictures!!!


COD-LIVER OIL LAMPS

Cod-liver oil lamps are manufactured in the old museum forge, along the lines of the old Nordic cod-liver oil lamps and those found in Nordland from the mid 1800's. The Nordic lamps hang from a wire (or a long hook) attached to the hook on the lamp itself. The Nordland lamps have three wick grooves and require more cod-liver oil than the other type. They can be either be hung up on the wall, or placed on the table.
The cod-liver oil is poured into the upper tray. The slope of the tray can be adjusted by moving the hook along the rail or by placing a suitable object between the table and the lamp. The wick is placed in the tray with the one end in the groove at the front, and can now be lit.

At which point we have "ignited a flame for our ancestors". They did their daily chores in the faint light of these lamps, during the long autumn and winter evenings, for thousands of years.

The flame can be adjusted by pushing or pulling the end of the wick with a stick. If the end of the wick is kept short, the lamp will not smoke or smell. Any cod-liver oil that drips down into the lower tray can be poured back by unhooking the tray.


"...ancient flames to enlight the mistery of leukemia in the new Century..."

ikod
« Last Edit: 30/10/2010 13:59:59 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #35 on: 16/10/2006 01:44:17 »
Considering the miracles brought about by cod liver oil, there should be a book on how the Norwegians saved civilization.
Great picture!
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #36 on: 16/10/2006 01:46:02 »
p.s. Please see my post in "my topic".
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #37 on: 16/10/2006 02:14:22 »
Iko,
  Go here for some history of how cod liver oil has been used in medicine for the last 150 years.
Zoey
http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/gadus_oleu.html
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #38 on: 16/10/2006 19:09:01 »
Thanks Zoey,
I had seen that 'historical' piece and I really enjoyed a refreshing second  glance...
I put together the best parts of it (according to me):
 
quote:
Action, Medical Uses, and Dosage.
Cod-liver oil is nutritive and alterative. It has long been used as a domestic remedy in chronic rheumatic and strumous diseases, especially in the northern parts of Europe, and has been in general medicinal use only since the treatise upon it by Prof. Bennett, of Edinburgh, in 1841, although employed occasionally in the profession as early as 1766. Cod-liver oil is a remedy for defective nutrition, and when tolerated can be relied upon to give good results...
When cod-liver oil "is kindly received by the stomach it increases the quantity of red corpuscles, improves the appetite and general strength, and the pulse becomes full and strong, flesh increases, and nutrition is improved" (Locke's Syllabus of Mat. Med., p. 346).

Though used for many conditions, it has been shown to do the most good in the poorly nourished, suffering from phthisis pulmonalis, tabes, rickets, chronic bronchitis, and chronic rheumatism in the scrofulous. It is not necessarily a curative agent, but in many conditions it tides the patient over while other agents exert their curative effects.
In rickets, given internally and applied locally to the spine, it is one of our best remedies.
...
It is also asserted to have been found useful in diseases of the joints and spine, lupus, obstinate constipation, worms, and incontinence of urine; and may be advantageously employed in all chronic cases, in which the disease appears to consist mainly in impaired digestion, assimilation, and nutrition.

But little advantage will be apparent from the administration of cod-liver oil, until its use has been persevered in for 5 or 6 weeks, though it often commences earlier.

The light-colored oil is the best

...
It may be given in coffee, milk, or brandy, and for consumptives in Bourbon. A pinch of salt sometimes renders it palatable, while others advise the chewing of a small portion of smoked herring.


http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/gadus_oleu.html

ikod...and you?
« Last Edit: 16/10/2006 19:11:22 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #39 on: 17/10/2006 03:19:21 »
Ikod, daily!
Zoe
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #40 on: 17/10/2006 05:42:39 »
This turned up in a search tonight. have you seen it?
Zoey



Plant derivative attacks the roots of leukemia
A daisy-like plant known as Feverfew or Bachelor's Button, found in gardens across North America, is the source of an agent that kills human leukemia stem cells like no other single therapy, scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center's James P. Wilmot Cancer Center have discovered. Their investigation is reported in the online edition of the journal, Blood.
It will take months before a useable, pharmaceutical compound can be made from parthenolide, the main component in Feverfew. However, UR stem cell expert Craig T. Jordan, Ph.D., and Monica L. Guzman, Ph.D., lead author on the Blood paper, say their group is collaborating with University of Kentucky chemists, who have identified a water-soluble molecule that has the same properties as parthenolide.

The National Cancer Institute has accepted this work into its rapid access program, which aims to move experimental drugs from the laboratory to human clinical trials as quickly as possible.
Full report:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2005-02/uorm-pda022205.php
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #41 on: 17/10/2006 19:09:04 »

    Feverfew


Thanks Zoey,
I didn't know those studies.
Even curcumin does well experimentally tested 'in vitro' and the same does vitamin D + carnosic acid (rosemary)...these are few from recent spicy positive studies reported in the medical literature.
Of course it is another promising path for future research.
As you probably well know, I support much more "that" weak epidemiological evidence:
simply safe and just ready to use for today's patients.
(talking about obsessions!)

ikodmania   
multiple quote:

...But little advantage will be apparent from the administration of cod-liver oil, until its use has been persevered in for 5 or 6 weeks, though it often commences earlier.
from: http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/gadus_oleu.html

...and when assumed for over one year it could be miraculous...
personal interpretation from:   Shu XO, 1988
.


"Il sole dona la vita, il sole se la riprende"    M.U. Dianzani 1975.

« Last Edit: 20/05/2007 17:26:34 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #42 on: 19/10/2006 03:56:17 »
Hi Iko,
  Can you translate the quote by Dianzani?
I have used feverfew and curcumin for years as non-drug medications.
  If we had access to some of the older medical manuals and took the time to put the information into the present context, we might [re]discover some significant healing properties of many plants. Westerners err in judging earlier forms of practice by today's knowledge and assumptions. Past healers knew often more than we do now about healing. But that knowledge must be "translated" from its historical to its present context to understand it's meaning.
 I  spent time with Native Americans who were healers. In order to grasp their practice, it was necessary to step out of my own "reality" and into theirs. A valuable experience, but one leading me to often feel an exile in my own culture.
  Some physicians or scientists may not see the potential value of cod liver oil as medicine because "food as medicine" is not part of their reality, their belief systems. And those systems of belief dictate what they see and can allow themselves to think.  When you ventured off the orthodox path, you freed yourself from the tyranny of doctrine. The dogmas of western medicine are being challenged now by the movement toward "alternative" treatments. Did you ever imagine that using common sense would make you seem a radical? Are you familiar with the herbal product called essiac and the controversy surrounding its use? It was nearly adopted as a legitimate cancer cure by the Canadian parliment at one time. It is taken from a Native American medicine.
http://www.enotalone.com/article/7345.html
 
"Viva Ikodmania!"
Zoey
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #43 on: 19/10/2006 09:05:56 »
Thank you Zoey,
for asking about my favourite quote.  Well, to explain it properly, in a short 'essay' in english... it will take me more than a few minutes!  But translating it is the easiest thing:

"The sun gives life, the sun takes it back"

These words concluded one of the best lectures I attended in my life. At the 3rd year of Medical school, General Pathology course, more than thirty years ago. Professor Mario Umberto Dianzani was our teacher, Dean of the Medical Faculty and a distinguished scientist, totally dedicated to his students.  Later on he was Rector of the University of Turin for several years before retiring.
In those days biochemistry was 'the' thing: new cofactors and vitamins were deeply explored by medical research.
I'm sure I owe to his excellent lectures my following research interest in cofactors.
  
I'll leave it as a sort of final closure of this topic.

Menu: Shanghai report in original + favourite quote, conclusions, full stop. Bye bye.

I'm in a rush right now: the 4 of us are flying to London for a 4 days holiday!
Take care
ikod
« Last Edit: 01/08/2008 18:05:55 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #44 on: 20/10/2006 03:39:37 »
Hi Iko,
  I hope you all enjoy your trip!
Zoey
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #45 on: 23/10/2006 18:56:22 »
Hi everyone,
I enjoyed four days of wind, rain and some sunrays (I wouldn't say sunSHINE) in London.  Great City.  I couldn't find the well known Cod Liver Oil Museum (joke, it probably is in Oslo, Norway!), but we visited many others and walked for miles and miles.
I hope I wasn't misunderstood about 'closing' this topic that I share with
an enthusiastic cofactor researcher/supporter like Zoey.
I actually think that it is coming to an end, like it should happen naturally.

You probably got my point: there was an initial question, but the real target was diffusion, more than discussion.
There isn't much space for discussion in my message:

Cod liver oil should be recommended as a nutrient to all leukemic patients.
(Personal opinion)


Thanks to this Forum I forced myself to write it in a proper form (did I manage?).  Now I should put the little bits together and let it 'surf' or better 'fly' closer and closer to sick chidren's parents:  Zoe's suggestion was a great encouragement for me to do so.
Right now I might need a good editor more than a discussant.
I made up my mind, took a decision, hope it's the correct one.
Take care

 
ikod
« Last Edit: 13/01/2007 22:00:51 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #46 on: 23/10/2006 20:51:51 »
Thank you Zoe,
 
quote:

...Are you familiar with the herbal product called essiac and the controversy surrounding its use? It was nearly adopted as a legitimate cancer cure by the Canadian parliment at one time. It is taken from a Native American medicine.
Zoey
http://www.enotalone.com/article/7345.html

I find this a very good statement:

A Natural Product Does Not Mean a Safe Product
Herbs and some plant-based products may keep medicines from doing what they are supposed to do. These medicines can be ones your doctor prescribes for you, or even ones you buy off the shelf at the store.


Sometimes people think that alternative is natural and good for you anyway (even if it costs money and doesn't have proper quality controls, chemical analysis and dosages!).



http://www.essiac-herbal.com/herb-garden-natsu.jpg

Essiac does not seem totally neglected by orthodox medicine (just recently). Write more informations if you have time, it sounds 'old' and traditional enough.
ikod
« Last Edit: 23/10/2006 21:52:00 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #47 on: 03/11/2006 22:26:49 »
Induction of remission of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after unrelated donor cord blood transplantation by concomitant low-dose cytarabine and calcitriol in adults.



Yamada K, Mizusawa m, Harima A et al.

Low-dose cytarabine and calcitriol (LDCA + VD3) combination therapy was performed in two adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that relapsed within 1 yr after unrelated donor cord blood transplantation (URD CBT) performed in a relapse or non-remission stage. Concomitant aclarubicin was also administered in one patient. Remission because of recovery of donor cord blood hematopoiesis was obtained in both patients. The treatment was low intensive, and neither adverse effects in terms of digestive symptoms nor hypercalcemia was observed. Activity of daily life was maintained. The patients were followed as outpatients after remission, and the remission duration was approximately 6 months in both patients. Although LDCA + VD3 therapy is minimally intensive chemotherapy, it may prolong the survival time of patients with relapsed AML after URD CBT

Eur J Haematol. 2006 Oct;77(4):345-8. Epub 2006 Aug 23



Leukemia came back 1 year after hyperchemio and stem cell transplant...
Simple drugs managed to control it for a while (6 months), allowing a decent quality of life.
Calcitriol is the active form vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol): here and there you find positive reports with long term use...it definitively takes time to work properly.
With very low toxicity (and little money).

One simple question: if a proper treatment with vitamin D3 (or cod liver oil) had been given streight after the hemopoietic stem cell graft...would they have relapsed later?

...a protective effect for long-term (greater than 1 year) use of cod liver oil containing vitamins A and D...
(from the "Shanghai report" published in 1988 and never confirmed)

Should cod liver oil be recommended as a nutrient for leukemic patients starting tomorrow?

ikod

...one out of the 13200 "beautiful sunrises" from Google Images
« Last Edit: 18/07/2008 18:30:55 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #48 on: 18/11/2006 12:03:35 »
...From an unspecified topic in "General Science" NSforum:

Sesame seeds
sesame butter
sesaminol
sesamolin

Sesaminol from sesame seed induces apoptosis in human lymphoid leukemia Molt 4B cells.
Miyahara Y, Hibasami H, Katsuzaki H, et al.

The exposure of human lymphoid leukemia Molt 4B cells to sesaminol, a component of sesame oil led to both growth inhibition and the induction of apoptosis. Morphological change showing apoptotic bodies was observed in the cells treated with sesaminol. The fragmentation of DNA by sesaminol to oligonucleosomal-sized fragments that are characteristics of apoptosis was observed to be concentration- and time-dependent. These findings suggest that growth inhibition of Molt 4B cells by sesaminol results from the induction of apoptosis in the cells.

Int J Mol Med. 2001 May;7(5):485-8.






Now then, if in your frantic 'surfing' on the Web you found something like this:

...According to medical authorities nothing is supposed to be effective in treating leukemia -- that's cancer of the blood. We know a doctor in the Midwest who had three children who got over leukemia just by eating sesame butter. He gave them six tablespoonfuls of sesame butter a day. Brown sesame seed butter (Tahini). That's not a very glamorous treatment for a serious illness but it worked.

http://209.85.129.104/search?q=cache:GztTWKxLt78J:www.usaplaza.com/scripts/wcom_producttree.asp%3FStoreID%3D1340%26ProductID%3D48398+%22sesame+butter%22+leukemia&hl=it&gl=it&ct=clnk&cd=1


...given the initial statement that "nothing is supposed to be effective", as a medical doctor you would correctly think that's a scam, a totally unproven commercial crap, just quackery.

Nevertheless, as a parent of a leukemia 'survivor' you would easily consider giving her/him at least some sesame-seed bread (traditional Sicilian bread) and grissini (sesame bread sticks), so tasty and good for you.  They make them fresh at the bakery just across the street, so it doesn't cost much to buy some once a week.  They disappear quite quickly from the kitchen counter (beside the cod caps container).
 

ikod



« Last Edit: 30/04/2007 23:24:06 by iko »
 

Offline GBSB

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #49 on: 19/11/2006 01:10:12 »
Quote
We know a doctor in the Midwest who had three children who got over leukemia just by eating sesame butter. He gave them six tablespoonfuls of sesame butter a day. Brown sesame seed butter. That's not a very glamorous treatment for a serious illness but it worked.

No name of the “Doctor” or name of the place or date or anything that can prove validity of this claim!


As long as cause and mechanism of leukemia is unknown, so long any commercialized cure is just exploitation of other people’s suffering.

It is fact that most people who develop the disease have not been exposed to any risk factors at all—the direct cause of leukemia is still unknown.

Till this time, there is no any knowledge of how prevent or cure leukemia.
If anything works to cure leukemia than world will be free from this terribly disease.

At this time, any case of cure of leukemia can be attributed only to spontaneous regression.

I think that understanding case of spontaneous regression of leukemia  is a key to win battle against this terrible disease.

Luka Tunjic

 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #49 on: 19/11/2006 01:10:12 »

 

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