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Author Topic: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?  (Read 233498 times)

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #75 on: 17/02/2007 08:49:15 »
Joke or not,
 one by one may be the most effective way to proceed.  Are you going to contact him? Maybe I should be searching on who is doing research in vitamin COL. It is difficult to search "research" "cod liver oil" as it returns the many sites that quote the word "research" to sell their nutritonal products which include "cod liver oil."
"I would like to discuss the most effective way to communicate the 'CLO in leukemia' message to parents and patients, to make 'weak evidence' less neglected, stressing the point of a safe and 'historically tested' nutrient.
Western medicine seems unfortunately stuck in a sort of endless loop between the lack of interest in the natural product and the crucial need to organize long and expensive controlled clinical trials."
   Discuss the first statement. What are possibilities [and they do exisit] to "communicate the 'CLO in leukemia' message to parents and patients" ?
 Why not an article that describes why the Shanghai Report is significant? Most of the information is here already in your posts?
 Another possibility is to contact some of the larger producers of COL and encourage more research [they may have the funds to do this]. 
   A researcher is turning up in my google travels tonight. The name is  S Halabi and I'm trying to locate this person who has done clinical studies on the use of fish oil in cancer\leukemia. It is certainly possible this scientist never saw the Shanghai Report and would be very interested in it. This is the report from my search:
2004 -- Pubmed # 15241836 -- Burns CP, Halabi S, Clamon G, Kaplan E, Hohl RJ, Atkins JN, Schwartz MA, Wagner BA, Paskett E. Phase II study of high-dose fish oil capsules for patients with cancer-related cachexia.  Cancer.  2004 Jul 15;101(2):370-8.
 Looking up one of these researchers led to this link:
http://biostat.duke.edu/modules/dukefaculty/viewDetails.php?d=halab001&t=1
 Another possible interested researcher?
Zoey
   



 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #76 on: 17/02/2007 08:52:12 »
If she isn't interested, she may know who would  have an interet in this.
Zoey
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #77 on: 17/02/2007 12:33:35 »
Quote
  A researcher is turning up in my google travels tonight. The name is  S Halabi and I'm trying to locate this person who has done clinical studies on the use of fish oil in cancer\leukemia. It is certainly possible this scientist never saw the Shanghai Report and would be very interested in it. This is the report from my search:
2004 -- Pubmed # 15241836 -- Burns CP, Halabi S, Clamon G, Kaplan E, Hohl RJ, Atkins JN, Schwartz MA, Wagner BA, Paskett E. Phase II study of high-dose fish oil capsules for patients with cancer-related cachexia.  Cancer.  2004 Jul 15;101(2):370-8.
 Looking up one of these researchers led to this link:
http://biostat.duke.edu/modules/dukefaculty/viewDetails.php?d=halab001&t=1

I would leave this direction:  it's a bit out of the way.
No vitamin D, just concentrated omega-3. Old story.
I would use it in any cancer patient as anti-cachexia.
I fortunately (for me) do not have patients like those.

I'll give Finland a second chance as you suggested.
Dr. Timonen was not impressed in 1999...he actually
wished me all the best for my little boy, and was
very busy in other studies, I assume.
Let's try Dr. Matti Tolonen.
I realized that you give a totally different 'weight'
to the Shanghai report statistical data whether you
have a sick relative or not.

ikod
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #78 on: 17/02/2007 23:10:55 »
   "Good wishes" are not what is needed. There needs to be some open debate and inquirey on the subject of using COL in ALL, prevention or during treatment. One other physician\researcher comes to mind as well. I have mentioned her before but will recheck before posting anything on her. I may look up the addresses for the major COL suppliers and to ask who is doing, or interested in doing research on COL. More people who can act on this issue need to be drawn into this discussion. Perhaps we should rent a plane that can pull a banner displaying the codfather and his message. If that fails, maybe a message in an empty [cod liver oil] bottle will get some attention to this subject.  There are other options, but we can only pull one trick out of our magic hats at one time.
Zoey

 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #79 on: 17/02/2007 23:34:10 »
   "Good wishes" are not what is needed. There needs to be some open debate and inquirey on the subject of using COL in ALL, prevention or during treatment. One other physician\researcher comes to mind as well. I have mentioned her before but will recheck before posting anything on her. I may look up the addresses for the major COL suppliers and to ask who is doing, or interested in doing research on COL. More people who can act on this issue need to be drawn into this discussion. Perhaps we should rent a plane that can pull a banner displaying the codfather and his message. If that fails, maybe a message in an empty [cod liver oil] bottle will get some attention to this subject.  There are other options, but we can only pull one trick out of our magic hats at one time.
Zoey

Wow! I like the plane pulling the banner: "Cod 4Kids!"
Seriously, no prevention for now, but HELP in a standard treatment that is actually stalling at 75% survival rate in the last 5-10 years. I think we have to start from here.
Did you check the survival diagram? Unfortunately I'm not able to stick the complete image, but just the link.
I still have to finish the final conclusions (work on progress) and hypothesis for the future (results).
While I complete this, please take any bit & piece you want, put them in any form and send them anywhere if you have an idea.  I feel there are few people interested in this topic.

ikod

« Last Edit: 19/02/2007 21:13:07 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #80 on: 18/02/2007 00:43:16 »
 I'll throw out a metaphorical line and see if we can reel in a good catch! Can you send any secrets on how to successfully load photos to this forum? I failed in my other attempt.
Zoey
 

paul.fr

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #81 on: 18/02/2007 00:53:13 »
I'll throw out a metaphorical line and see if we can reel in a good catch! Can you send any secrets on how to successfully load photos to this forum? I failed in my other attempt.
Zoey

I had the same problem zoey...the general advice i was given was to create an account at photobucket and upload your pictures there. on your photobucket page are you pictures with http links to each individual picture. you then click the inserct image icon in this forums post reply/new topic page.

it is above the "smilies" and directly beneath the B for bold text. and you get the text img and /img in brackets in your post. between the two sets of brackets is where you put the http link for your photo.

another good way to find out how others do it, is to find a post with a picture in it and hit the quote button not the reply button. this will show you what their "code" looked like when they put their picture up..hope that makes sense.

Paul
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #82 on: 18/02/2007 01:12:24 »
Thanks Paul,
  I'll try it "tomorrow"
:)
Zoey
 

paul.fr

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #83 on: 18/02/2007 01:13:05 »
 

paul.fr

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #84 on: 18/02/2007 01:14:25 »
Thanks Paul,
  I'll try it "tomorrow"
:)
Zoey

your my kind of gal
:-)

Paul
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #85 on: 18/02/2007 03:05:33 »
Thanks Paul,
 I'll go and read Niel's post.
Zoey

 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #86 on: 18/02/2007 03:30:27 »
 The banner for the plane isn't finished yet but we may have a catch here. I'm so glad the codfather invented Google searches. Dr. Christian A Devron is at the University of Oslo's Institute for Nutrition Research. Below is information about his work and contact information. His homepage with contact information:
http://folk.uio.no/christia/index.htm


Clin C;12 (11):3525-31 16740779 A bioactively modified Fatty Acid improves survival and impairs metastasis in preclinical models of acute leukemia. [My paper] Per O Iversen , Dag R Sørensen , Karl J Tronstad , Oddrun A Gudbrandsen , Arild C Rustan , Rolf K Berge , Christian A Drevon PURPOSE: Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the sulfur-substituted fatty acid tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in lymphoma and leukemic cell lines, but it is unknown if they can modify leukemogenesis in the intact organism. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We now examined the effects of PUFA and TTA in rats transplanted with either acute promyelocytic leukemia or acute T-cell leukemia. The rats were randomized to isoenergetic diets containing either lard (control), omega3 (n-3) PUFA, or TTA. RESULTS: Whereas TTA prolonged survival (P < 0.05) in both types of rat leukemia, n-3 PUFA had no significant effect compared with controls. Only TTA inhibited (P < 0.05) leukemic infiltration in the bone marrow and spleen, probably due to apoptosis of the leukemic cells. Plasma metalloproteinase activity, a marker of metastatic activity, was significantly reduced in TTA-fed rats only. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of TTA, but not of n-3 PUFA, in rats with acute leukemia, prolonged their survival. TTA intake was also associated with reduced leukemic cell burden as well as diminished extramedullar dissemination. TTA represents a modified fatty acid that exerts unique effects on malignant hematopoietic cells, and the present study indicates that TTA may have a therapeutic potential in patients with acute leukemias. ancer Res. 2006 Jun 1

Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care ...
 
Heimli H, Finstad HS, Drevon CA. Necrosis and apoptosis in lymphoma cell lines exposed to ... A long-term seal- and cod-liver-oil supplementation in ...
www.co-clinicalnutrition.com/pt/re/conutrition/fulltext.00075197-200203000-00014.htm;jsessionid=GlVKLTmgN   

Clin C;12 (11):3525-31 16740779 A bioactively modified Fatty Acid improves survival and impairs metastasis in preclinical models of acute leukemia. [My paper] Per O Iversen , Dag R Sørensen , Karl J Tronstad , Oddrun A Gudbrandsen , Arild C Rustan , Rolf K Berge , Christian A Drevon PURPOSE: Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the sulfur-substituted fatty acid tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in lymphoma and leukemic cell lines, but it is unknown if they can modify leukemogenesis in the intact organism. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We now examined the effects of PUFA and TTA in rats transplanted with either acute promyelocytic leukemia or acute T-cell leukemia. The rats were randomized to isoenergetic diets containing either lard (control), omega3 (n-3) PUFA, or TTA. RESULTS: Whereas TTA prolonged survival (P < 0.05) in both types of rat leukemia, n-3 PUFA had no significant effect compared with controls. Only TTA inhibited (P < 0.05) leukemic infiltration in the bone marrow and spleen, probably due to apoptosis of the leukemic cells. Plasma metalloproteinase activity, a marker of metastatic activity, was significantly reduced in TTA-fed rats only. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of TTA, but not of n-3 PUFA, in rats with acute leukemia, prolonged their survival. TTA intake was also associated with reduced leukemic cell burden as well as diminished extramedullar dissemination. TTA represents a modified fatty acid that exerts unique effects on malignant hematopoietic cells, and the present study indicates that TTA may have a therapeutic potential in patients with acute leukemias. ancer Res. 2006 Jun 1
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #87 on: 18/02/2007 05:18:01 »
 We don't do a lot of cod fishing in New Mexico, so am doing a test photo posting of my neighborhood.

  This is a picture overlooking the Gila River Valley.
   

   
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #88 on: 18/02/2007 05:20:42 »
 We don't do a lot of cod fishing in New Mexico, so am doing a test photo posting of my neighborhood.

  This is a picture overlooking the Gila River Valley.
    

  
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #89 on: 18/02/2007 18:37:47 »
Well, and this is the river Po valley in Turin, North of Italy.
A lot of birds, fishes...but NO cods!



« Last Edit: 04/07/2008 21:29:20 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #90 on: 19/02/2007 05:31:33 »

How did the cod deficiency affect the evolution of the culture?
Zoey
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #91 on: 19/02/2007 18:49:18 »

How did the cod deficiency affect the evolution of the culture?
Zoey


Good question, I'd like to know history better than I actually do.
To simplify your difficult question I would start like this:
Cod liver oil is certainly very good stuff for the undernurished, but its components can be found in other nutrients.
Vitamin A for sure, omega-3 in some seed-plant (different type, similar effects).
And vitamin D...here we are: vitamin D can be assembled by the skin itself through sunlight exposure.
That is tricky, so northern countries have a problem and somebody in certain areas found the solution for rickets and osteomalacia using cod.
As with other cofactors, some people eventually need more to counteract their congenital (invisible) metabolic defects, others do just fine with a minimal dose here and there.
We have probably been selected over generations to be 'cod' independent.
Difficult to find, it works after weeks, so the cause/effect link is easily missed.
It is definitely dedicated to our sick children.
To help their growth, brains and strenghten their immune system.
A bit of help from the ocean where we all came from.
Am I corny enough?

ikod



...and -repetita juvant- the ancient quote from Zoey's collection!

Quote

"Cod liver oil is in the forefront of children's remedies.

For long it has been struggling against the scepticism of exact science"


Rosenstern:  Berl. klin. Wchuschr. 47;822, 1910.
 

from:  "The history of cod liver oil as a remedy"
          Ruth A. Guy  M.D.
          Dept. of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine
          Am. J. of diseases of children    26; 112-116, 1923.

« Last Edit: 07/03/2007 18:26:11 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #92 on: 20/02/2007 04:39:25 »
Yes, you are corny enough. I thought you may be drinking fermented COL.
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #93 on: 24/02/2007 03:03:57 »
  Will discussing some of the aspects of nutritional factors that may make a person more vulnerable to developing cancer [as other illnesses] lead back to COL? This study cited below found children newly diagnosed with ALL had decreased levels of zinc and increased concentrations of copper:
=======================
Sao Paulo Med. J. vol.117 n.1  São Paulo Jan. 1999
Nutritional assessment and serum zinc and copper concentration in leukemic children
Pediatric Section, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto,
Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

INTRODUTION

Malnutrition is one of the major problems in cancer patients. Athough not prevalent in all pediatric cancers, malnutrition in childhood cancer is a common, serious problem.1 Cancer patients usually have inadequate energy and protein intakes, increased metabolic rate and abnormalities in energy, carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism.2 Cancer therapy with chemotherapy and radiation therapy is also potentially damaging to nutritional status.3"

"Trace Elements vs. Cancer

This study demonstrated altered serum zinc and copper levels in patients with newly diagnosed leukemia.

The blood serum levels of zinc and copper in malignant diseases have been the subject of a multitude of investigations, and their possible involvement has been well-recognized in many cancerous conditions. Altered zinc and copper concentrations in the plasma or serum have been previously reported in cancer patients.21,24,25

The general trend towards slightly decreased zinc concentrations in malignant diseases supports the experimental results obtained by Brown et al26 suggesting that zinc deficiency is associated with the etiology of cancer.

Several studies27,28 show that serum Cu levels in malignant disease increase in relation to disease activity. Remission is usually associated with the return of Cu levels to normal ranges. Serum Cu is suggested as a useful index for the extent of leukemia and malignant lymphoma, and may predict response to chemotherapy .

Recent studies suggest that the use of blood zinc and copper concentration and the copper/zinc ratio (Cu/Zn) may be useful parameters for estimating the presence and prognosis of malignant tumors.6,9,29

A far more comprehensive study of the basic mechanism for alteration of serum copper and zinc and its significance in all malignancies is needed."
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1516-31801999000100003&script=sci_arttext
==================
The study focused on dietary intake, of copper and zinc. It did not look at whether there might be a metabolic process that might account for the altered concentrations of zinc and copper.
  Zinc is thought necessary for the proper metabolism of vitamin A. The research on this looks mighty small, most not recent. There is some information available:
"Zinc deficiency is thought to interfere with vitamin A metabolism in several ways: 1) Zinc deficiency results in decreased synthesis of retinol binding protein (RBP), which transports retinol through the circulation to tissues (e.g., the retina). 2) Zinc deficiency results in decreased activity of the enzyme that releases retinol from its storage form, retinyl palmitate, in the liver. 3) Zinc is required for the enzyme that converts retinol into retinal (8, 9). At present, the health consequences of zinc deficiency on vitamin A nutritional status in humans are unclear "
"Disease Prevention

Cancer

Studies in cell culture and animal models have documented the capacity for natural and synthetic retinoids to reduce carcinogenesis significantly in skin, breast, liver, colon, prostate, and other sites (2). However, the results of human studies examining the relationship between the consumption of preformed vitamin A and cancer are less clear.
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminA/
=============

"Synergistic effect of zinc and vitamin A on the biochemical indexes of vitamin A nutrition in children
 Zinc deficiency limits the bioavailability of vitamin A. Because zinc and vitamin A deficiency often coexist in malnourished children, simultaneous zinc and vitamin A supplementation may improve the vitamin A deficiency in these children."
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/75/1/92
=============
 I saw references but did not yet find, articles on  how vitamin A deficiency might influence zinc metabolism and concentrations. Could it be that the cod liver oil use noted in the Shanghai Report was helping to correct unrecognized deficiencies in those children?

Zoey





 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #94 on: 24/02/2007 12:45:57 »
Yes Zoey,
malnutrition is reported in children diagnosed ALL-AML.
Zinc deficiency and increased copper had been described and eventually considered 'epiphenomena', sort of shades of what is happening in the body: infection? An overidden immune response?
Overall the massive expansion and invasion of a bulk of immature cells (blasts) in the bone, liver, spleen and lymphatic glands.
Vitamin A deficiency could aggravate zinc deficiency as well: cod liver oil might prevent this effect ameliorating an endless list of metabolic reactions and modifying an abnormal immune response to a 'common pathogen'(Mel Greaves' theory!).

At the very beginning of treatment of ALL this problem is dramatically solved.
These patients are given such a massive dose of steroids that makes them constantly hungry.
High dose steroid treatment has the capability of killing the lymphoblasts and inducing a remission of disease in a few weeks.
These children crave for salty foodstuff.  You may find your kid in the kitchen at 6am, frantically cooking two scrambled eggs...
Egg yolks have tons of zinc and vitamin A as well.


Giving large amounts of zinc (e.g. for acne) you may decrease copper adsorption and even induce severe copper deficiency.  But I wouldn't play with these mechanisms not knowing what is really happening around!

ikod
« Last Edit: 24/02/2007 17:19:39 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #95 on: 24/02/2007 17:15:11 »
Note:
Zinc and vitamin A seem to work together
helping malnourished children to survive.


Simultaneous zinc and vitamin A supplementation in Bangladeshi children:
 randomised double blind controlled trial.

Rahman MM, Vermund SH, Wahed MA, Fuchs GJ, Baqui AH, Alvarez JO.
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh. mujib_99@yahoo.com

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of simultaneous zinc and vitamin A supplementation on diarrhoea and acute lower respiratory infections in children.
STUDY DESIGN: Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.
SETTING: Urban slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: 800 children aged 12-35 months were randomly assigned to one of four intervention groups: 20 mg zinc once daily for 14 days; 200 000 IU vitamin A, single dose on day 14; both zinc and vitamin A; placebo. The children were followed up once a week for six months, and morbidity information was collected.
RESULTS: The incidence and prevalence of diarrhoea were lower in the zinc and vitamin A groups than in the placebo group. Zinc and vitamin A interaction had a rate ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.79 (0.66 to 0.94) for the prevalence of persistent diarrhoea and 0.80 (0.67 to 0.95) for dysentery. Incidence (1.62; 1.16 to 2.25) and prevalence (2.07; 1.76 to 2.44) of acute lower respiratory infection were significantly higher in the zinc group than in the placebo group. The interaction term had rate ratios of 0.75 (0.46 to 1.20) for incidence and 0.58 (0.46 to 0.73) for prevalence of acute lower respiratory infection.

CONCLUSIONS: Combined zinc and vitamin A synergistically reduced the prevalence of persistent diarrhoea and dysentery. Zinc was associated with a significant increase in acute lower respiratory infection, but this adverse effect was reduced by the interaction between zinc and vitamin A.

BMJ. 2001 Aug 11;323(7308):314-8


« Last Edit: 24/02/2007 17:17:34 by iko »
 

Offline iko

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #96 on: 27/02/2007 22:32:43 »
Talking of sending a message about cod liver oil for sick children...

...let's borrow these lines from the "Nutrition and Disease" topic:



Note from:   Philip R. Evans
        Infantile scurvy: the centenary of Barlow's disease.
        Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1983 Dec 17;287(6408):1862-3.

James Lind served as a surgeon's mate in the Royal Navy.  He saw many cases of scurvy during his nine years at sea, and after leaving the service and graduating as a MD in Edinburgh he published his "Treatise on scurvy"(1753).
This proposed that in people predisposed to scurvy "an additional, and extremely powerful cause observed at sea was...the want of fresh vegetables and greens."  He showed that the juice of oranges or lemons was both curative and preventive, and strongly recommended that this should be given routinely to all sailors.  Despite his intensive campaign the Admiralty did not take up his suggestions until a year after his death in 1794, when lemon juice was added to sailor's rations.

1753-1794...40 years lost in useless discussions and hyper-egoes fights? The correct answer was already there!  For a disease which killed a million seamen between 1600 and 1800.

ikod

« Last Edit: 28/02/2007 18:52:21 by iko »
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #97 on: 03/03/2007 21:54:43 »
    Are we not seeing this same sort of historical scene repeating itself now, on other health issues as well as regarding the usefulness of cod liver oil? Failure to recognize the role of nutrition in illness is not much improved over the last century when vitamins were first identified.
   As for COL, one answer may be to follow strategies used by foundations for various diseases and disorders. They often carry out 'education' and 'awareness' campaigns.  It may well be that many cod liver oil manufacturers are not aware of the Shanghai Report. They may well have an interest in having  their marketing professionals organize an 'awareness campaign on this issue as it would surely increase sales and interest in their product.  This is the same strategy used when drug companies fund awareness campaigns about conditions, like osteoporosis, which serve to promote the companies' drugs for this condition.
  My suggestions:
   1. Form a core group, a small foundation and set up a web page listing a clear statement of purpose; to get the word out on the benefits of cod liver oil in ALL and to promote research in this area.
    2. Post information and articles on COL and the Shanghai Report on the web page emphasizing that many may be suffering for lack of information on how COL may be beneficial. Also emphasize the need for more research and education of the public about this potential miracle treatment that is being overlooked.
    3. Establish a research fund.
    4. If possible, enlist the support of one well known public figure who will promote the foundation's work and solicit support.
    5. Organize a scientific discussion forum on the topic, such as "Cod Liver Oil as a Preventive for ALL: The Shanghai Report Reconsidered". It doesn't need to be a large forum, but having a few well known scientists participate will make it newsworthy to larger media outlets.
    6. Organize a public forum on the issue, perhaps within a month or so after the scientific one, aimed at parents who are concerned about nutrition and the prevention of childhood Leukaemia.
    7. Once the content of the forums is developed and in written form, make it available to as many COL producers and distributors as possible. Solicit their interest in funding and promoting the campaigns as well as having representatives present at the forums.
    8. Develop extensive public relations campaigns for each of the forums. Press releases and newspaper articles which can be distributed world wide via the net. There should also be press releases and promotional articles directed to scientific oriented media. If the foundation has succeeded in getting support from some of the manufacturers, they should be able to assist or even take over this task.
  9. Write an account in a small book, Such as "The Shanghai Report Reconsidered: How Cod Liver Oil May Reduce the Risk of Developing Childhood Leukaemia". Time it's release to coincide with the forums and the public awareness campaigns. Press releases reviewing this "remarkable" book should also be made to library, academic, and health oriented media at this time.
    10. Solicit the assistance of any of the COL manufacturers' public Relations Departments to help the foundation promote the cause [and increase COL sales].

Do you think this simple plan has potential, merit? I am already getting a list ofcontact information for manufacturers\producers organized. It would surprise me if they were not interested in the Shanghai Report and perhaps taking an active interest in this issue. Maybe we should just draft a proposal for the above, and send it to various COL companies asking for support and advice in putting the proposal into action.
Zoey
   
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #98 on: 03/03/2007 22:02:02 »
 Good news! The first COL producer that came up in the search advertises its role in "research and education".
Zoey
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #99 on: 03/03/2007 22:52:40 »
The second company explored also is involved in research also.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Vitamin D deficiency in Leukemia?
« Reply #99 on: 03/03/2007 22:52:40 »

 

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