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Author Topic: The scientist whom history forgot  (Read 21016 times)

Offline Mjhavok

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Offline eric l

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Re: The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #1 on: 15/08/2006 08:50:50 »
Frankly, I had never heard of her (or rather :  I don't recall ever hearing of her).  Considering the number of replies so far, this must be the case for most users of this forum, so I don't blame myself.
It's a shame though, because I must have passed within 10 miles (15 km actually) of her castle at least 4 or 5 times.  (I did some Googling to find that out.)  This castle is a museum now, and it would have been interesting to check how much "coverage" she gets compared to Voltaire.
When I check your statistics, they show that about 25 % of the members are women, and about 33 % are men.  I'm not quite sure about the 42 % who pretend to be neither, I suspect there is about the same ration of (rouhgly) 3 to 4 among those.
Looking at the different postings in the threads I follow on a regular basis, the degree of activity shows a similiar ratio.  Of course the user names don't always give a clue as to the gender, and there may very well be some women using male names, just like the famous 19th century novelists George Elliot in England and Georges Sand in France did.  
Anyway, women nowadays are much better represented in the scientific community than they were in the 18th century.  And that is not just the case for women :  how many among us would have belonged to a social class where discussing scientific matters was even thinkable ?
« Last Edit: 15/08/2006 08:53:31 by eric l »
 

Offline Mjhavok

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Re: The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #2 on: 15/08/2006 18:37:21 »
I think the prominence of women in science is just recently got better. What about Rosalind Franklin? Her work lead to the double helix model by Watson & Crick but she gets nowhere near the amount of recognition they do.

-Steven
 

Offline rosy

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Re: The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #3 on: 15/08/2006 19:11:06 »
The Rosalind Franklin thing is a bit of a canard as I understand it. She didn't get awarded the Nobel Prize when the others did because by that stage, tragically, she'd already died (cancer of some sort, I think). Since Nobel Prizes are never awarded posthumously, she missed out on some of the recognition.
There may have been issues around her being a woman, etc, but I wouldn't be surprised if they'd been talked up a bit..
 

Offline rosy

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Re: The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #4 on: 15/08/2006 19:12:44 »
Was Emilie du Chatelet the one they had a radio 4 series about recently?
 

Offline Radrook

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Re: The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #5 on: 12/09/2006 10:56:38 »
quote:
Originally posted by Mjhavok

I think the prominence of women in science is just recently got better. What about Rosalind Franklin? Her work lead to the double helix model by Watson & Crick but she gets nowhere near the amount of recognition they do.

-Steven



Here is an other woman scientist:

Nitza_Margarita

In 1979, Cintron was the originator of the Biochemistry Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitza_Margarita_Cintron [nofollow]

 

Offline dkv

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The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #6 on: 29/09/2007 07:51:43 »
I am also a scientists scientist who has been forgotten.
big deal
 

Offline that mad man

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The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #7 on: 30/09/2007 14:28:52 »
As I like electronics I propose Alan Blumlein 1903-1942

Not many people seem to be aware of him or his many inventions, has 128 patents to his name and died in tragic circumstances.

The man responsible for how your TV works! Its his electronic inventions that gave us the national analogue TV we use today and not, as some believe, John Logie Baird. Bairds mechanical TV was abandoned in favour of Blumlein.

I believe he is also responsible for us having stereo sound systems?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Blumlein



Must admit, Rosalind Franklin would have been my other choice! :)

 

Offline rosalind dna

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The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #8 on: 11/12/2007 15:52:45 »
I will always think that Rosalind Franklin, who is sometimes called the Dark Lady of DNA
because she had actually discovered through her crystallography diffraction research work, the Single DNA Helix Structure for which her now infamous Slide 51 photo of the helix.

Although Crick was given her Slide 51 but Maurice Wilkins and this identified
for Crick and Watson the Double Helix of DNA structure, but she had actually
seen the Double Helix.

It's sad that Rosalind Franklin died of ovarian cancer at the young age of
37 in 1958.
 

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The scientist whom history forgot
« Reply #8 on: 11/12/2007 15:52:45 »

 

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