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Author Topic: Would the double-slit experiments give different results in space  (Read 2775 times)

Offline jeffreyH

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Does gravity have an effect on the double slit experiment.


 

Offline lightarrow

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I don't think so. Otherwise there would have been a difference in the result (here on Earth) simply rotating the entire apparatus in the different directions.

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lightarrow
« Last Edit: 08/01/2014 19:04:45 by lightarrow »
 

Offline Bill S

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Gravity effects the passage of light, so it must influence the path of light through the double slit apparatus.  I think you would have to have an over-sized set up to spot the difference, though. :)
 

Offline jeffreyH

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The reason I asked was that if the interference pattern differed it may be a clue to the way gravitation works. The light path should get less curved the further it is away from the source of gravitation.
 

Offline evan_au

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One of the first experiments claiming to demonstrate gravitational time dilation on Earth was an interferometer, somewhat similar to the double-slit experiment.

A coherent beam with a very short wavelength was split into two and then recombined. By rotating the apparatus, it was possible to have the two beams separated vertically, or equidistant from the center of the Earth. A phase shift was detected between the two positions.

The double-slit experiment should be able to be rotated in the same way, showing a small shift between the positions of the dark and light bars (it would not be apparent with visible light, and the apparatus would need to be very rigid or mechanical sagging would affect the result).

Presumably the phase shift would be less if the experiment were done in deep space, far from a gravitational mass, and greater if done on a neutron star.

Technically, this is a measure of gravitational gradient (ie tidal force), rather than absolute gravitational strength.
 

Offline jeffreyH

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One of the first experiments claiming to demonstrate gravitational time dilation on Earth was an interferometer, somewhat similar to the double-slit experiment.

A coherent beam with a very short wavelength was split into two and then recombined. By rotating the apparatus, it was possible to have the two beams separated vertically, or equidistant from the center of the Earth. A phase shift was detected between the two positions.

The double-slit experiment should be able to be rotated in the same way, showing a small shift between the positions of the dark and light bars (it would not be apparent with visible light, and the apparatus would need to be very rigid or mechanical sagging would affect the result).

Presumably the phase shift would be less if the experiment were done in deep space, far from a gravitational mass, and greater if done on a neutron star.

Technically, this is a measure of gravitational gradient (ie tidal force), rather than absolute gravitational strength.

I wonder if the tidal force is effected by the density of mass. I have come to the conclusion that field strength has no amplification with mass-energy density. Though I have the intuitive feeling that dilation and tidal forces will be amplified.
 

Offline MrVat7

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Gravity does not affect double slit experiment. As all the photons are accelerated equally by gravity , it would show almost same results in outer space unless you go near black hole and perform double slit experiment
 

Offline jeffreyH

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Gravity does not affect double slit experiment. As all the photons are accelerated equally by gravity , it would show almost same results in outer space unless you go near black hole and perform double slit experiment

I take your point. As observers it is difficult to think of ways to test such results as we are also affected by the gravitational field in much the same way. It is interesting to ponder though.
 

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