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Author Topic: Could long-term storms like those on Jupiter form on Earth?  (Read 1089 times)

Offline thedoc

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Daniel Elegante asked the Naked Scientists:
   
I teach Chemistry in Alabama in the US and a student had this question:

Could a storm that rages on for years and years, like the one Jupiter, be formed here on earth?
 
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Danny Elegante
PreAP Chemistry & AP Chemistry
BobJones High School
Madison, AL
     
What do you think?
« Last Edit: 19/01/2014 10:30:01 by _system »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Earth does have relatively stable Polar Vortices, and relatively stable jet streams which significantly affect the weather including the formation of the great deserts and rain forests. 

As far as hurricanes and typhoons, I think the continents tend to divert their paths and break them up when the storm makes landfall.  If Earth had only oceans and no continents, it might have persistent hurricanes. 
 

Offline yor_on

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Sounds reasonable Clifford. If I remember right the red spot on Jupiter is a result explained through chaos mathematics, a non linear system impossible to predict in detail, yet able to produce longstanding, possibly extremely long lived structures. Maybe we can have similar phenomena here too? small structures? I don't know but I think they should be able exist, although storms tend to move here, and so break down as you said.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1946&dat=19851221&id=1r4qAAAAIBAJ&sjid=f7kFAAAAIBAJ&pg=881,466673
 

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