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Author Topic: Is there a problem with allowing one's hands and feet to get cold?  (Read 1068 times)

Offline CliffordK

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Is there a problem with allowing one's hands and feet to get cold?

At times I'll be doing something and my hands get so cold that they start getting stiff.  Or, my toes feet will get to be significantly below "body temp", perhaps just feeling cold. 

Obviously allowing them to actually freeze (frostbite) is very bad.  But, what about letting them just get cold, say 40-50F, or 5-10C?

Also, why do the fingers feel so stiff when most of the finger muscles are in the arms?


 

Offline evan_au

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The enzymes that drive the chemical reactions in our bodies have an optimum temperature of operation.
Move very far from that optimum, and reactions don't work so well, and our bodies don't work so well.
When we are in very cold weather, our bodies reduce blood supply to the extremities (fingers, toes, ears, nose), so as well as reduced temperature control, they are getting reduced oxygen and energy supply.
 

Offline cheryl j

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It always seemed to me like human comfort range was way too narrow compared to other animals. I realize we don't have fur coats, but even so, we function pretty well at, say, 40 F, why is it still unpleasant unless you are warmly dressed? Or is it a modern thing because we are so accustomed to a steady in door temperature? Were my ancestors a lot more temperature tolerant than I am? I think people do acclimate a bit. After a few weeks of -20 F in Canada, 20 F above feels noticeably warm when you go outside.
 

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